Press

CIS in the news.

  • Our FTC Privacy Story And Its Critics

    Date published: 
    July 6, 2012

    On June 28, ProPublica published a story by Peter Maass about the Federal Trade Commission and its efforts to protect the online privacy of consumers. The headline of the story was "How a Lone Graduate Student Scooped the Government and What It Means for Your Online Privacy." The 5,500 word article opened with an explanation of how a Stanford computer science student, Jonathan Mayer, conducted research through which he discovered earlier this year that Google was circumventing the privacy settings on a large number of iPhones and placing tracking cookies on them. The story credited Mr.

  • Is Orbitz being creepy or smart?

    Date published: 
    June 26, 2012

    That "creepiness" might in itself be cause for concern, says Ryan Calo, a privacy expert with Stanford Law School's Center for Internet and Society. "The fact that people are creeped out by this is legitimate, and itself registers as a privacy harm," says Calo. He adds that if people don't understand how sites are arriving at prices, or feel like they're being manipulated, they might stop transacting business online.

    Read the full story at the original publication link below. 

  • Debate Club: Should Police Need A Warrant To Get Your Location From Your Mobile Phone Provider?

    Date published: 
    June 26, 2012

    Also on his side (in this debate) is Rep. Jason Chaffetz, who makes a straightforward 4th Amendment argument, the ACLU's Catherine Crump, who not surprisingly focuses on the privacy arguments and Jennifer Granick from the Center for Internet and Society talking about how the lack of a warrant requirement leaves the system wide open to abuse by law enforcement. 

    Read the full story at the original publication link below. 

  • How will driverless cars affect liability and insurance?

    Date published: 
    June 26, 2012

     

    “It’s accepted in our world that there will be a shift,” says Bryant Walker Smith, a legal fellow at Stanford University’s law school and engineering school who studies autonomous-vehicle law, reported Popular Science. “If there’s not a driver, there can’t be driver negligence. The result is a greater share of liability moving to manufacturers.”
     
    Read the full story at the original publication link below. 
  • Orbitz Asks: Are You A Mac Or A PC?

    Date published: 
    June 26, 2012

    If you visit Orbitz.com and search for hotels, the offers you're shown might differ depending on whether you're using a Mac or a PC. Specifically, if you're using a Mac, the travel site sometimes shows pricier options than if you're using a PC, according to a report in today's Wall Street Journal.

  • Safety Is Big Concern for Autonomous Cars

    Date published: 
    June 26, 2012

    Researchers are hard at work to make sure that autonomous cars will be safe. In doing so, a wealth of technology is making its way into today's vehicles. 

    Watch the full story at the original publication link below. 

     

  • Without Regulation, GPS Technology Easily Abused by Authorities

    Date published: 
    June 25, 2012

    Article by Director of Civil Liberties Jennifer Granick for US News.

    Police should be required to get authorization from a judge before they use technological gadgets to follow you 24/7. That's what the Geolocation Privacy and Surveillance Act would require.

  • Ready for a self-driving car? Check your driveway.

    Date published: 
    June 25, 2012

    "In the near term, we're likely to see increased driver assistance," says Bryant Walker Smith, a fellow at the Center for Automotive Research at Stanford University in California. Few people are ready to put a car on autopilot, but, through baby-step innovations, "technology will really become something of a copilot."

    Read the full story at the original publication link below. 

     

  • The FTC should take a broader look at transparency

    Date published: 
    June 23, 2012

    The Federal Trade Commission has been investigating Google for a year now, looking in part at whether Google is operating “fairly” in its search results. But if the FTC is really serious about protecting consumers, the agency may be better off taking a broader industry-wide look at search engine transparency and labeling practices.

    Read the full story at the original publication link below. 

  • Facebook to require privacy policies for all apps in App Center

    Date published: 
    June 22, 2012

    With Facebook and the other app stores, Harris has sewn up "a huge chunk of the app universe," said online privacy expert Ryan Calo, an incoming law professor at the University of Washington. Harris can then use her authority to prosecute app makers that mislead California consumers about what they do with their personal information. The penalties could be stiff under California law: as much as $5,000 per download.

    Read the full story at the original publication link below. 

  • No, You Can’t Use a Drone to Spy on Your Sexy Neighbor

    Date published: 
    June 22, 2012

    What are the laws against drones—and their masters—behaving badly? Turns out, there are few that explicitly address a future where people, companies, and police all command tiny aircraft. But many of our anxieties about that future should be assuaged by existing regulations. We asked Ryan Calo, a law professor at the University of Washington, to weigh in on some of the issues.

    Read the full story at the original publication link below. 

  • Cyberwarfare: No New Ethics Needed

    Date published: 
    June 20, 2012

    In an interesting recent essay in the Atlantic – ‘Is it Possible to Wage a Just Cyberwar?’ – Patrick Lin, Fritz Allhoff, and Neil Rowe argue that events such as the Stuxnet cyberattack on Iran suggest that the way we fight wars is changing, as well as the rules that govern them. It is indeed easy to see how nations may be tempted to use cyberweapons to attack anonymously, from a distance, and without the usual financial and personnel costs of conventional warfare. (See also Mariarosaria Taddeo’s interesting recent post on this blog.)

  • Could a cyberwar ever be ethical?

    Date published: 
    June 19, 2012

    The Atlantic has published a fascinating article about how the ongoing digital revolution is changing the face of war, and how military and government leaders are failing to adopt a new ethics to match. Written by cyberwar and emerging technology experts Patrick Lin, Fritz Allhoff, and Neil Rowe, the essay makes the case that just-war theory still applies – even when the battlefield is digital.

    Read the full story at the original publication link below. 

  • Brett Frischmann on Infrastructure as a Commons

    Date published: 
    June 18, 2012

    It’s unlikely that we are ever going to get a book as rigorous and comprehensive in its treatment of infrastructure as a commons than Professor Brett Frischmann’s recently published Infrastructure: The Social Value of Shared Resources (Oxford University Press). This book is a landmark in the study of the social value of infrastructure, a theme that is generally overlooked or marginalized.

    Read the full story at the original publication link below. 

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