Press

CIS in the news.

  • Bloomberg to NYC: Domestic drones are inevitable

    Date published: 
    March 25, 2013

    "Cameras mounted on buildings that have facial recognition capability, for example, needn't be lofted on a flying drone to be a privacy concern, Ryan Calo, an associate professor of law at the University of Washington explained to NBC News."

  • A driverless car has gone 300,000 miles without an accident, says Jeb Bush

    Date published: 
    March 25, 2013

    "Based on the number of car crashes in the United States and the miles traveled, he concluded that Google's cars would need "to drive themselves (by themselves) more than 725,000 representative miles without incident for us to say with 99 percent confidence that they crash less frequently than conventional cars. If we look only at fatal crashes, this minimum skyrockets to 300 million miles. To my knowledge, Google has yet to reach these milestones.""

  • Journalism schools start teaching students to fly drones

    Date published: 
    March 22, 2013

    ""In 2015, when the FAA is set to begin to relax its prohibition on use and integrate civilian use of drones, then I would think the first folks in the door would be media because there's such an obvious use," Ryan Calo, a law professor at the University of Washington, testified during a Senate hearing earlier this week. "

  • Drone use in U.S. may require new laws, Senate panel told

    Date published: 
    March 20, 2013

    ""There's very little in American privacy law that would limit the domestic use of drones for surveillance," Calo said. Calo said he thinks the aircraft can be extremely beneficial but warned that Americans may oppose their use unless there are some limits."

  • Senate Committee Urged to Update Privacy Laws in Face of Increasing use of Drones

    Date published: 
    March 20, 2013

    "Ryan Calo, assistant professor of law at the University of Washington School of Law, told the committee that citizens have good reason to be concerned about the increasing use of drones for an array of purposes. During his testimony, Calo reiterated the need for the nation to update laws to protect privacy – technology is fast outpacing laws protecting privacy."

  • No GPS tracking without warrant, ACLU demands

    Date published: 
    March 19, 2013

    "A warrant "is particularly important when it comes to GPS tracking because the technology is cheap, convenient, difficult to detect, and highly intrusive," writes Catherine Crump, the ACLU attorney expected to speak before the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit on Tuesday, on the ACLU blog."

  • Google to Congress: Time to change email laws

    Date published: 
    March 19, 2013

    "In testimony before a House judiciary subcommittee on Tuesday, Richard Salgado, a Google director for law enforcement and information security, said the 1986 Electronic Communications Privacy Act “though ahead of its time in many ways, needs to be brought in line with how people use the Internet today.”"

  • Don't call 'em drones: The wide world of unmanned flying machines

    Date published: 
    March 15, 2013

    "Ryan Calo, a professor of law at the University of Washington, also calls them drones. To him, a drone needs to have three qualities: First, it needs to be able to fly. Then, it needs to have some sensing capacity: a camera or an infrared sensor, or similar. And finally, Calo's drones are capable of some level of autonomy, perhaps following GPS coordinates or a moving guide."

  • Regulate the Robots

    Date published: 
    March 14, 2013

    But not every kind of robotmaker should be responsible for its creations. Ryan Calo of University of Washington Law School argues that to foster start-up-style innovation in home and service robots, the platforms have to be open, meaning that any app developer can write a program that teaches your floor-mopping robot to clean windows too — much as smartphones have been taught to do more than make calls. The fault for any hiccups would be with the app developer or the user.

  • From 'WarGames' to Aaron Swartz: How U.S. anti-hacking law went astray

    Date published: 
    March 13, 2013

    ""The extraordinary potential sentences are a result of political pressure by the Department of Justice, characteristic of their pressing for higher penalties in all sorts of areas of criminal regulation," says Jennifer Granick, director of civil liberties at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society, who has represented hackers facing criminal charges."

  • Will Congress Unfriend Mark Zuckerberg?

    Date published: 
    March 13, 2013

    "Aleecia McDonald, director of privacy for the Stanford Center for Internet and Society, agrees that "Coming to a common understanding of ways to put users in control of their online experience through Do Not Track would be better for all stakeholders.""

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