Press

CIS in the news.

  • Cleaning Up The Dirty

    Date published: 
    April 19, 2017

    "“Richie is taking advantage of what I’d understand as something like a liminal state,” said law professor Danielle Citron, who wrote the book Hate Crimes in Cyberspace. She said that Section 230 needs to be altered to discourage site operators from primarily hosting defamatory material or content that invades privacy.

    “He’s in the gray zone. And so he worked it for years. It’s really just despicable. The whole business model is despicable.”"

  • Crime, live on video: The beast Facebook can’t control

    Date published: 
    April 19, 2017

    Daphne Keller, Director of Intermediary Liability at Stanford’s Center for Internet and Society, told Quartz Facebook’s turnaround time was actually quite fast. Keller worked for years as an attorney at Google, and said that having been “on the other side,” she witnessed the massive volume of user reports these companies get, and how many of the flags they get are simply wrong or not actionable. “I don’t think it’s realistic to do anything better.”

  • Jio wants Net Neutrality exceptions for Specialised and Managed services, Payments

    Date published: 
    April 18, 2017

    "Our Take: This goes against the TRAI’s own approach to Net Neutrality regulation. In its ruling on differential pricing, the TRAI had noted:

    “Intuitively, the case-by-case approach may seem reasonable. However, this approach creates substantial social costs as noted by Barbara Van Schewick in “Network Neutrality and Quality of Service: What a NonDiscrimination Rule Should Look Like,” Stanford Law Review, 2015.

  • The man behind the neo-Nazi Daily Stormer website is being sued by one of his ‘troll storm’ targets

    Date published: 
    April 18, 2017

    "“I think it’s an incredibly important lawsuit,” said Danielle Citron, a law professor at the University of Maryland who specializes in online privacy. Digital harassment is a relatively untested area for lawsuits like this, and would-be plaintiffs often face two challenges: It’s expensive to bring a case, and online harassment isn’t always taken as seriously as physical harassment by individual judges or jury members, “especially of a certain generation,” Citron said."

  • Facebook’s biggest challenge: actual reality

    Date published: 
    April 18, 2017

    "“Social media companies need to think very carefully about what next steps they’re going to take,” said Malkia Cyril, executive director for the Center for Media Justice. “It’s a fine line to walk between maintaining safety and maintaining freedom of speech.”"

  • A Murder Posted on Facebook Prompts Outrage and Questions Over Responsibility

    Date published: 
    April 17, 2017

    “Any of these platforms — especially live ones — encourages users to perform,” said Elizabeth Joh, a law professor at the University of California, Davis. “Should Facebook have a duty to rescue a crime victim? Should we, or is it O.K. for thousands or millions of people to watch a crime unfold without doing anything except sharing it?”

    Read the full story at The New York Times

  • A Murder Posted on Facebook Prompts Outrage and Questions Over Responsibility

    Date published: 
    April 17, 2017

    "“Any of these platforms — especially live ones — encourages users to perform,” said Elizabeth Joh, a law professor at the University of California, Davis. “Should Facebook have a duty to rescue a crime victim? Should we, or is it O.K. for thousands or millions of people to watch a crime unfold without doing anything except sharing it?”"

  • Civil Rights Lawyers Plan to Challenge New York’s Body-Camera Program

    Date published: 
    April 16, 2017

    "Harlan Yu, a principal at Upturn, a consulting firm that evaluates police body-camera policies on a range of measures, agreed.

    “Being the largest department in the country, they have the opportunity here to be leaders on policy,” Mr. Yu said. Instead, he added, the department chose guidelines that “tend to favor the department and its officers and not rules of the road and safeguards that will protect the community when cameras are used.”"

  • Facebook wanted ‘visceral’ live video. It’s getting live-streaming killers and suicides.

    Date published: 
    April 16, 2017

    "“It's amazing how performative people are in their cruelty,” said Danielle Citron, a University of Maryland law professor who has worked with Facebook and other tech companies to block “revenge porn” and prevent cyberstalking.

    Yet the issue is complicated for technology companies, which have wide latitude to host content created by others without being legally responsible for it, Citron said."

  • Artificial Intelligence based systems can gain human biases

    Date published: 
    April 14, 2017

    "These biases range from the morally neutral to the objectionable views – preference for birds over animals to views on race and gender. “We have a situation where these artificial intelligence systems may be perpetuating historical patterns of bias that we might find socially unacceptable and which we might be trying to move away from,” said Arvind Narayanan, Assistant Professor at Princeton University."

  • Biased bots: Human prejudices sneak into artificial intelligence systems

    Date published: 
    April 13, 2017

    ""Questions about fairness and bias in machine learning are tremendously important for our society," said researcher Arvind Narayanan, an assistant professor of computer science and an affiliated faculty member at the Center for Information Technology Policy (CITP) at Princeton University, as well as an affiliate scholar at Stanford Law School's Center for Internet and Society.

  • AI programs exhibit racial and gender biases, research reveals

    Date published: 
    April 13, 2017

    "“A major reason we chose to study word embeddings is that they have been spectacularly successful in the last few years in helping computers make sense of language,” said Arvind Narayanan, a computer scientist at Princeton University and the paper’s senior author."

  • Princeton-Fung Global Forum asks if liberty can survive the digital age

    Date published: 
    April 13, 2017

    "With new technology has come cheaper forms of surveillance, according to Harlan Yu, who received a Ph.D. in 2012. Yu is a principal at Upturn, an organization that provides internet expertise for policymakers on a range of social issues.

    "You don't need a great rationale to collect all of the data you can get your hands on," Yu said. "Not only is collection easy and cheap, but the tools that data collectors now have to use that data — the tools that are used to make predictions — have also gotten a lot more powerful.""

  • Uber’s self-driving plans hit bump in the road

    Date published: 
    April 13, 2017

    “We are at the point where companies are really understanding there is a lot of money at stake,” says Bryant Walker Smith, a professor of law and engineering at the University of South Carolina. He expects these commercial opportunities to drive more and more IP cases in the sector. “There is greed and fear. There will be winners and losers and that could happen pretty soon.”"

  • Economists are arguing over how their profession messed up during the Great Recession. This is what happened.

    Date published: 
    April 12, 2017

    Over the past two weeks, academic economists (and a couple of bystanders) have been arguing about why economics wasn’t able to guide policy better during the Great Recession. Some blame nonacademic economists. Others blame prominent academics. Others still say that economic advice doesn’t really matter, because politicians will pay attention only to the advice that they wanted to hear anyway.

  • ‘Motley Crew’ Is The Unsettling Future Of Drone Warfare

    Date published: 
    April 12, 2017

    "Anti-autonomous weapons advocate groups are concerned about how these cooperative swarms will select targets, according to Peter Asaro, co-founder of the International Committee for Robot Arms Control (ICRC) and spokesperson for the Campaign to Stop Killer Robots. He said it depends on whether these drones are more akin to sophisticated guided missiles controlled by humans, or autonomous killing machines.

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