Press

CIS in the news.

  • Berkshire County Groups Call for Action to Protect Net Neutrality

    Date published: 
    December 12, 2017

    "Barbara van Schewick, a Stanford Law School professor and director of the Stanford Center for Internet and Society, writes that Pai's plan "discards decades of careful work by FCC chairs of both political parties, who recognized and acted against the danger internet service providers posed to the free markets that rose out of and depend on the Internet. If his plan takes effect, ISPs would be free to disrupt how the Internet has worked for 30 years.""

  • Should Robots Have Rights?

    Date published: 
    December 8, 2017

    "As robots gain citizenship and potential personhood in parts of the world, it’s appropriate to consider whether they should also have rights.

    So argues Northeastern professor Woodrow Hartzog, whose research focuses in part on robotics and automated technologies.

  • E-commerce tracking practices raise privacy questions

    Date published: 
    December 8, 2017

    "Richard Forno, assistant director of the UMBC Center for Cyber Security, noted that researchers have found many companies that use technology like NaviStone's but don't disclose it in their privacy policies.

    "It's not surprising that companies are probably violating their own policies because of this," he said. "But then again, who reads the privacy policies? ... People don't even know what privacy policies are sometimes."

  • The stupidest patents of 2017

    Date published: 
    December 8, 2017

    "Nazer believes none of these patents should have been granted in the first place, having failed to overcome the basic legal requirements of being both original and non-obvious. A big part of the problem, he says, has to do with how the patent office works.  “Patent examiners spend an average of only 18 hours reviewing each application,” he told me, “which is grossly inadequate.”"

  • The rise of smart machines puts spotlight on 'robot rights'

    Date published: 
    December 4, 2017

    "Maybe that makes sense from the perspective of pure logic. But Ryan Calo, an expert in robotics and cyber law at the University of Washington in Seattle, says our laws are unlikely to bend that far. “Our legal system reflects our basic biology,” he says. If we one day invent some sort of artificial person, “it would break everything about the law, as we understand it today."

  • Uber’s Data Breach: Can the Company Course-correct?

    Date published: 
    December 1, 2017

    "“The reputational issues … really matter when a consumer is faced with trusting a machine with her safety and getting from point A to Point B without fear of malfunction and/or compromise and the result is potentially physical dismemberment and death,” said Andrea Matwyshyn, professor of law and computer science at Northeastern University and an affiliate scholar at the Center for Internet and Society at Stanford University.

  • Microsoft touts rural broadband plan at governors' meeting in Phoenix

    Date published: 
    December 1, 2017

    ""We're launching a series of pilot projects in states around the country over the course of five years," said Ryan Harkins, director of state affairs and public policy at Microsoft. 

    Harkins explained the plan during a session of the winter 2017 meeting of the Western Governors Association in Phoenix on Friday. He was part of a panel discussing the past and future of the Western United States.'

  • The Copyright Mavericks

    Date published: 
    November 30, 2017

    "Townsend-Gard dreams of a world where librarians and researchers and students don’t have to waste time on copyright determinations. “I really believe that copyright should be more like electricity, where you don’t have to figure out how it’s made,” she says. You should just be able to hit a button and get your answer."

  • Why Police Body Cams Aren’t What They Seem to Be

    Date published: 
    November 29, 2017

    "Few people have looked at these issues as closely as Harlan Yu at Upturn, a nonprofit based in Washington DC, who studies technology’s impact on civil rights and social justice issue.

  • SCOTUS Case Could Redefine 'Reasonable Expectatio of Privacy'

    Date published: 
    November 29, 2017

    "“A lot of what we’re getting at in the Carpenter case,” said Woodrow Hartzog, professor of law and computer science at Northeastern, “is a growing sense of discontent from the judges over the seemingly simplistic rules we crafted years ago about when and how the government can surveil and collect information about us in light of all these powerful information technologies."

  • Trump administration’s repeal of net neutrality a big gift to America’s internet providers

    Date published: 
    November 29, 2017

    "Net neutrality advocates have also expressed concern that ISPs could block certain sites outright. Barbara van Schewick, a net neutrality expert at Stanford University, writes that“Verizon told a federal court in 2013 that it should have the right to charge any website any fee Verizon liked — and if, for instance, the Wall Street Journal didn’t pay up, Verizon should be allowed to block its site.”"

  • The top-rated post ever in r/Nascar is about net neutrality

    Date published: 
    November 28, 2017

    "The backlash may threaten Republicans’ prospects in the US midterm elections next year. “There’s a movement afoot that Republican members of Congress ignore at their peril,” says Ryan Singel at Stanford Law School’s Center for Internet and Society. Democrats may make it an issue in 2018 when all 435 seats in the House of Representatives and 33 seats in the Senate will be contested."

  • Sharing your location with your bank seems creepy, but it's useful

    Date published: 
    November 28, 2017

    "Albert Gidari, the director of privacy for the Center for Internet & Society at Stanford Law School, agreed that most of the bank's efforts with geolocation are “innocuous.”

    But he added that the always-on function seems excessive. After all, is calling your bank to tell them you're traveling that much of an inconvenience?

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