Press

CIS in the news.

  • Foreign spying comes under new scrutiny from lawmakers

    Date published: 
    July 1, 2018

    "“The federal government is the largest consumer of commercial wireless services and is susceptible to the same cybersecurity risks in our communications infrastructure,” Jonathan Mayer, a computer science professor at Princeton University, told the panel.

    “A foreign intelligence service could easily use cell-site simulators to collect highly confidential information about government operations, deliberations and personnel movements,” Mayer added."

  • Instagram Account That Sought Harassment Tales May Be Unmasked

    Date published: 
    July 1, 2018

    "The Diet Madison Avenue suit, filed in Los Angeles, named the account and a string of Jane and John Does, representing dozens of people it believed were associated with the account. Their identities could be revealed if Instagram is subpoenaed and ordered to turn over subscriber information. The court could grant the subpoena depending on how it interprets Mr. Watson’s defamation claim, said Danielle Citron, a law professor at the University of Maryland and the author of the book “Hate Crimes in Cyberspace.”

  • California Lawmakers Pass Sweeping Online Privacy Legislation

    Date published: 
    June 29, 2018

    "“Something of this magnitude getting passed through unanimously in both chambers is really astounding,” said Omer Tene, chief knowledge officer of the International Association of Privacy Professionals, in an interview with Adweek.

  • The Cybersecurity 202: Cellphone spying has lawmakers worried. But they don't know how to stop it.

    Date published: 
    June 28, 2018

    "“I’m not aware of any instance where a law enforcement agency has successfully tracked down one of these devices,” Jonathan Mayer, a chief technologist at the Federal Communications Commission’s Enforcement Bureau, told the subcommittee. Nor has the Justice Department prosecuted anyone for operating a cell site simulator, he added. 

    The challenge, Mayer said, was that there was no “telltale sign of cell site simulation . . . there are only indicia that give rise to suspicion.”"

  • How NXIVM Used the Strange Power of Patents to Build Its “Sex Cult”

    Date published: 
    June 27, 2018

    "But even when the U.S.P.T.O. granted patents to Raniere for his inventions (which they did for over 20), it shouldn’t necessarily be considered proof of brilliance, according to Daniel Nazer, attorney and Mark Cuban Chair to Eliminate Stupid Patents at the Electronic Frontier Foundation. Nazer said, “If your whole shtick is going around and convincing people that you’re this genius, then the patent system is a way to buttress that.

  • YouTube keeps deleting evidence of Syrian chemical weapon attacks

    Date published: 
    June 26, 2018

    "However, a video for example showing Isis recruitment can violate the law in one context, but also be legal and important for purposes such as documenting crimes for future prosecution, says Daphne Keller, intermediary liability director at Stanford's Centre for Internet and Society.

    “The more we push companies to carry out fast, sloppy content removals, the more mistakes we will see,” Keller says. She thinks lawmakers should “slow down, talk to experts including both security researchers and members of the affected communities, and build on that foundation”."

  • Police: Backup driver in fatal Uber crash was distracted

    Date published: 
    June 22, 2018

    "Both Vasquez and Uber could still face civil liability in the case, Uber for potentially negligent hiring, training and supervision, said Bryant Walker Smith, a University of South Carolina law professor who closely follows autonomous vehicles.

    Vasquez could be charged criminally, and if there's evidence that Uber or its employees acted recklessly, then charges against them are possible, Smith said. But charges against the company are not likely, he added.

  • Massachusetts Welcomes Self-Driving Cars—With a Couple Caveats

    Date published: 
    June 21, 2018

    "“I'm really pleased to see the coordination with and among cities,” says Bryant Walker Smith, who studies autonomous vehicle legislation at the University of South Carolina School of Law. “One of the keys to getting the most out of automated driving will be to empower communities.”"

  • How Twitter Made The Tech World's Most Unlikely Comeback

    Date published: 
    June 21, 2018

    "“They are incredibly serious about addressing abuse and harassment, threats, and nonconsensual pornography,” University of Maryland law professor Danielle Citron told BuzzFeed News. Citron, who sits on Twitter’s Trust and Safety Council and has no financial relationship with the company, said things are getting better on Twitter, at least from her vantage point. “Because I write about cyberstalking and harassment and threats, I get countless emails. But there are less about Twitter,” she said."

  • What 7 Creepy Patents Reveal About Facebook

    Date published: 
    June 21, 2018

    "As long as Facebook keeps collecting personal information, we should be wary that it could be used for purposes more insidious than targeted advertising, including swaying elections or manipulating users’ emotions, said Jennifer King, the director of consumer privacy at the Center for Internet and Society at Stanford Law School. “There could be real consequences,” she said."

  • AT&T Trickery Helps Kill California’s Looming Net Neutrality Law

    Date published: 
    June 21, 2018

    "“There was no discussion of the amendments,” notes net neutrality activist and journalist Ryan Singel, fellow at Stanford Law School's Center for Internet and Society. “Holding a vote before testimony is incredibly aggressive. That guts the bill and the way it was done was a slap in the face of the democratic process. It's exactly how Pai handled the 2017 net neutrality repeal.”"

  • Lessons From Making Internet Companies Liable For User's Speech: You Get Less Speech, Less Security And Less Innovation

    Date published: 
    June 18, 2018

    "Stanford's Daphne Keller is one of the world's foremost experts on intermediary liability protections and someone we've mentioned on the website many times in the past (and have had her on the podcast a few times as well). She's just published a fantastic paper presenting lessons from making internet platforms liable for the speech of its users. As she makes clear, she is not arguing that platforms should do no moderation at all.

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