Press

CIS in the news.

  • Visiting professors express concerns on how big data, mass surveillance will affect criminal justice system

    Date published: 
    February 23, 2018

    "Hu delivered a presentation on big data and cyberspace in the criminal justice system.

    Hu said the government uses mass surveillance to gather data on people. People are “flagged” based on what they do on the internet and when they do it, Hu said.

    “In a big data, cyber-surveillance world, the analytical method is to start with the data,” Hu said. “The data becomes suspicions — it’s not necessarily that people are suspicious anymore. This leads to pre-crime ambitions — to stop crime before it starts.”"

  • From fake news to fabricated video, can we preserve our shared reality?

    Date published: 
    February 22, 2018

    "“When you see something, or when you believe that you’re seeing something and hearing something, it has a much more visceral impact on you, by and large, than when it’s something that you’re just reading about,” says Henry Farrell, a professor of political science at George Washington University in Washington.

    “So I suspect that as we begin to see people really begin to use these techniques, we’re going to see content being circulated which really punches you in the solar plexus in a way that wasn’t true of other forms of fake news,” he says."

  • This Startup’s Test Shows How Harassment Targets Women Online

    Date published: 
    February 21, 2018

    "Danielle Citron, law professor at the University of Maryland and the author of Hate Crimes in Cyberspace, says Enthoven’s experience lines up with research on both abuse aimed at call-center workers and on online misogyny and the harassment of women. The combination of user anonymity—which creates a lack of accountability for one’s actions—and the distance created by screens heightens the conditions for abuse, Citron says.

  • Is it time to crack down on facial recognition?

    Date published: 
    February 20, 2018

    "Peter Asaro, a philosopher of technology at the New School in New York, said it may be best to see how authorities use the tools before getting too specific with regulations.

    “I think we need transparency and improved privacy regulations now, and will likely need more as new applications emerge,” Asaro said."

  • People are talking about sexual consent. Would an app help?

    Date published: 
    February 20, 2018

    "Danielle Citron, a professor of law at the University of Maryland and an expert on sexual privacy, also fears that consent could be coerced. But the real elephant in the room is that consent can change. “Consent apps do not capture any of the nuance in our interactions, and the changes in context can be dizzyingly fast,” she explained."

  • Is it time to crack down on facial recognition?

    Date published: 
    February 20, 2018

    "Peter Asaro, a philosopher of technology at the New School in New York, said it may be best to see how authorities use the tools before getting too specific with regulations.

    “I think we need transparency and improved privacy regulations now, and will likely need more as new applications emerge,” Asaro said."

  • Open records are in the public’s best interest

    Date published: 
    February 19, 2018

    "“It’s certainly the case that birthday and name alone are unlikely by themselves to lead to identity theft, or they shouldn’t,” said Ryan Calo, a University of Washington law professor specializing in digital issues.

    Calo said government has legitimate concerns about releasing records that could cause problems, such as information about children. Privacy is important and deserves protection, he said."

  • “Just an Ass-Backward Tech Company”: How Twitter Lost the Internet War

    Date published: 
    February 19, 2018

    "Danielle Citron, a Twitter trust and safety partner and a professor at the University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law, emphasized that if Harvey’s team is sometimes slow to address abuse, it’s only because they care so much about getting each case right. “They mean it when they say they care about speech that terrorizes and silences,” Citron said. “They really do have their users’ speech issues in mind in a way that’s very holistic.”"

  • IU Study Recommends Creating National Cybersecurity Safety Board

    Date published: 
    February 19, 2018

    "Business law professor and author of the study Scott Shackelford says it would be similar to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation model. He says that model is applicable to cybersecurity.

    “It’s not only formal investigators that dig into the details of why an airplane happened to crash, but they look into bigger issues like culture at manufacturers, at airlines,” says Shackelford. “We thought a similar approach would be really helpful for cybersecurity because typically, it’s not just one thing that’s at fault in big data breaches.”"

  • Connected Cars Will Run on Your Personal Data

    Date published: 
    February 19, 2018

    "“This is the kind of technological advancement that’s intended to bring public safety and individual safety to the forefront,” Albert Gidari, the director of privacy at Stanford University’s Center For Internet and Society, told me over the phone."

  • From Disruption to Dystopia: Silicon Valley Envisions the City of the Future

    Date published: 
    February 18, 2018

    "“The whole point of a smart city is that everything that can be collected will be collected,” Al Gidari, the director of privacy at Stanford University’s Center for Internet and Society in California, told the CBC. If smart cities really wanted to give people more control over their privacy, they wouldn’t collect any of it unless people opted in."

  • The Repeal of Net Neutrality Could Kill Independent Porn

    Date published: 
    February 13, 2018

    "“The net neutrality repeal, at its heart, is really a way to allow the companies that we pay to get online, the Comcasts, the AT&Ts, the Verizons of the world, to make more money by figuring out how to get money out of the businesses that are online,” said Ryan Singel, the Media and Strategy Fellow at Stanford Law School’s Center for Internet and Society on a call with Jezebel."

  • Why Uber and Google Went to War Over Almost Nothing

    Date published: 
    February 12, 2018

    "“There were lots of overlaps and informal sharing and all kinds of personalities early on,” says Bryant Walker Smith, a law professor at Stanford who specializes in automated driving technology. The Uber–Waymo case can be seen, he says, as “tidying up loose ends dealing with the remnant messiness from the beginning,” said Smith. Still, just because the case is settled doesn’t mean the road that lies ahead for automated driving is any less rocky."

  • DHS’s Kaspersky Lab court filings reveal telling details

    Date published: 
    February 7, 2018

    "IT CAN’T BE DONE — Senior Trump administration officials are wrong to suggest that encrypted platforms can be engineered to provide access for government investigators without seriously compromising their security, according to a new paper by a Stanford University cryptography expert."

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