Press

CIS in the news.

  • Forget Congress. Facebook’s real problem is in Europe.

    Date published: 
    April 12, 2018

    Over the past two days, U.S. observers of Facebook have been focusing on Mark Zuckerberg’s testimony to Congress, and the question of whether U.S. politicians might introduce new regulations of Facebook’s privacy and data sharing practices. They have been missing the real story.

  • Woman Awarded $6.5 Million in 'Groundbreaking' Revenge Porn Case Against Ex-Boyfriend

    Date published: 
    April 11, 2018

    "Danielle Citron, a law professor at the University of Maryland and outspoken advocate of victims of nonconsensual porn, calls the verdict “groundbreaking.” She says it’s rare for victims to have the funds to sue their harassers, and that this pro-bono case helps establish “that there can be serious financial consequences to perpetrators.” That, she says, could act as a deterrent to future would-be revenge pornographers."

  • What's at stake for Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg as he testifies for Day 2

    Date published: 
    April 10, 2018

    "Traditionally, the FTC will settle these type of cases because proving consent decree violations is difficult, says Woodrow Hartzog, professor of law and computer science at Northeastern University. But this situation with Facebook could be different, he says. "We can learn a lot from watching what happens after FTC reaches the conclusion of its investigation." 

  • Californians Don’t Want Autonomous Cars in Their Neighborhoods

    Date published: 
    April 9, 2018

    "Bryant Walker Smith, chairman of the Emerging Technology Law Committee at the Transportation Research Board of the National Academies, says he thinks survey respondents would change their minds if they had the opportunity to test autonomous vehicle prototypes.

    "People would've said the same thing about smartphones," Smith says. "Automated vehicles will find a significant market if they save money, expand mobility or free up time.""

     

  • Adult film producer Strike 3 Holdings settles copyright infringement case

    Date published: 
    April 9, 2018

    "Firms such as Strike 3 sending scores of DMCA take-down notices to alleged copyright offenders that threaten them with lawsuits is “a lot of work for everyone,” Ben Depoorter, a professor at the University of California, Hastings College of the Law, told the Northern California Record.

    “It is an expensive strategy of issuing subpoenas, finding IP addresses and people’s identities,” Depoorter said."

  • Experts: Education key to safe use of Autopilot

    Date published: 
    April 9, 2018

    "Although driver-assist features can increase vehicle safety, Bryant Walker Smith, a University of South Carolina law professor who specializes in self-driving vehicles, said automakers should make clear what their systems can and cannot do, and be transparent about how safety calculations are made.

  • Why you shouldn't blame Facebook for what ails democracy

    Date published: 
    April 7, 2018

    ""There's always a danger when you have a scandal like Cambridge Analytica that we attribute a very large problem to the villain du jour," said Ben Scott, a senior adviser to the Open Technology Institute in Washington, D.C. and a former State Department official.

    "It brings to mind the logic that if we solve for Cambridge Analytica, we reverse all these underlying problems which have been weakening democratic institutions for a generation. And of course, that's not true.""

  • If Facebook gets regulated, thank vegans

    Date published: 
    April 5, 2018

    "Danielle Citron, chairwoman the Electronic Privacy Information Center, a group that focuses on emerging data privacy and civil liberties issues, says the food movement could provide a roadmap for how to create better data privacy laws. She’s published an authoritative look into how state attorneys generals have shaped data privacy law. Tech companies would be particularly averse to a patchwork of state regulations, Citron says.

  • Startups Want to Use the Blockchain to Take Our Data Out of Uber's Hands

    Date published: 
    April 5, 2018

    "“The idea that mainstream consumers will directly interact with blockchain technology—or any piece of code—without intermediaries is completely silly,” wrote Arvind Narayanan, a computer science professor at Princeton who studies blockchain, in an email. “I think that success in these markets will be driven primarily by economies of scale, and the openness of the underlying technology is irrelevant to consumers.”"

  • I Was Harassed for My Interracial Relationship—So I Tracked Down My Troll

    Date published: 
    April 5, 2018

    "The most recent report from StatsCan shows that over the last five years, nearly one in five people between the ages 15 and 29 say they have experienced a form of online harassment. And while no one is completely immune from being targeted online, the web is not an equal playing field—especially for women of colour, says Shaheen Shariff, a professor at McGill University’s Faculty of Education and an expert on cyberbullying.

  • Maryland governor settles lawsuit with ACLU over Facebook censorship

    Date published: 
    April 3, 2018

    "The agreement is "good for free speech and for our democracy," said Neil Richards, a professor at Washington University Law School who specializes in First Amendment theory.

    Regardless, Richards said, government officials shouldn't pick and choose what can appear in a public forum — opening themselves up to lawsuits over constitutionality.

  • Florida law allows driverless vehicles. Does the law go too far?

    Date published: 
    April 2, 2018

    "Florida hasn’t been as dramatic with its legislation as other states, said University of South Carolina law professor Bryant Walker Smith, who studies autonomous vehicles. Instead of passing one bill on the subject, Brandes and other lawmakers have taken a more subtle approach, passing key autonomous vehicle provisions as part of an omnibus bill.

  • California launches system allowing driverless cars to ditch their backup drivers

    Date published: 
    April 2, 2018

    "“The public is going to know more about automated driving because of California and not because of the federal government,” said Bryant Walker Smith, an assistant professor of law at the University of South Carolina who has studied how California and other states have approached driverless regulation. “The federal government has asked the companies to share information. California compels them to share information as a regular part of their testing and operations.”"

  • Tech giants brace for sweeping EU privacy law

    Date published: 
    April 1, 2018

    "Marshall Erwin, director of trust and security at Mozilla, said that his company rewrote its privacy policy and overhauled its privacy settings to prepare for the new European regulatory regime. But Mozilla designed its services, like its signature Firefox browser, to collect minimal amounts of user data, he said.

    “It is going to be much more challenging for a lot of other companies that collect more data from their users, that have much more complex data collection mechanisms,” Erwin said."

  • Facebook 'ugly truth' memo triggers new firestorm over ethics

    Date published: 
    March 31, 2018

    "Patrick Lin, director of the ethics and emerging sciences group at California Polytechnic State University, said he sees "no evidence that Facebook's culture is unethical, though just one senior executive in the right place can poison the well."

    "I'd guess that most Facebook employees want to do the right thing and are increasingly uncomfortable with how the proverbial sausage is made," Lin added."

  • Tesla Driver Died Using Autopilot, With Hands Off Steering Wheel

    Date published: 
    March 30, 2018

    "“This is another potential illustration of the mushy middle of automation,” Bryant Walker Smith, a University of South Carolina law professor who studies self-driving cars, said in an email. Partial automation systems such as Tesla’s Autopilot “work unless and until they don’t,” and there will be speculation and research about their safety, he said."

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