Press

CIS in the news.

  • People are going to sell sex in driverless cars, researchers say

    Date published: 
    November 12, 2018

    "“There are dangers of collision, of getting thrown around,” said Bryant Walker Smith, a law professor at the University of South Carolina who focuses on autonomous vehicles, “and if you’re doing particularly intense activities, you’re going to be at risk of unusual injuries.”

    This possibility doesn’t halt related brainstorming at AV conferences, he added.

    “Automated vehicles as a platform for the delivery of services is a common theme,” Smith said. “Sex work is just one set of possible services. ”"

  • Should the Government Require Companies to Meet Cybersecurity Standards for Critical Infrastructure?

    Date published: 
    November 12, 2018

    Richard Forno, director of the graduate cybersecurity program and assistant director of the Center for Cybersecurity at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, makes the case for government standards and oversight. Anne Hobson, a program manager with the Mercatus Center at George Mason University, argues that the development of targeted, sector-specific solutions is the better option.

    YES: The industry can’t do it on its own

    By Richard Forno

  • You thought fake news was bad? Deep fakes are where truth goes to die

    Date published: 
    November 12, 2018

    "When Danielle Citron, a professor of law at the University of Maryland, first became aware of the fake porn movies, she was initially struck by how viscerally they violated these women’s right to privacy. But once she started thinking about deep fakes, she realized that if they spread beyond the trolls on Reddit they could be even more dangerous. They could be weaponized in ways that weaken the fabric of democratic society itself.

  • Obscurity by Design

    Date published: 
    November 7, 2018

    To make sense of this world, and to try to sift through the new emerging definitions of privacy, I turned to Woodrow Hartzog. In recent years, Hartzog has emerged as an important thinker on matters of design, privacy, and power relationships between users and tech companies. A professor of law and computer science at Northeastern University, Hartzog has written for the mainstream press about these issues, sometimes in collaboration with his colleague Daniel Solove.

  • Uber report looks to rebuild goodwill with regulators

    Date published: 
    November 4, 2018

    "“A person died because Uber was testing its vehicles under circumstances that appear to be irresponsible at best,” said Bryant Walker Smith, assistant professor at the University of South Carolina’s law school, who writes regularly about autonomous driving. “This [report] is a good start. But Uber in particular should go further.”"

  • Trump's Game of Thrones Tweet Is Odd—but Probably Not Trademark Infringement

    Date published: 
    November 2, 2018

    "A dilution claim also generally requires that the entity claiming infringement be able to prove the public was genuinely confused. Because Trump’s tweet wasn’t being used in commerce, and because it’s unlikely anyone thought he was legit affiliated with Game of Thrones, dilution would be a hard argument to make. "I think this would be a tough, a tough case," Nazer says. "No one is likely to be confused that HBO is endorsing this tweet or sponsoring sanctions against Iran. My view is that this shouldn’t be a viable suit.""

  • Uber wants to resume self-driving car tests on public roads

    Date published: 
    November 2, 2018

    "Although the report covered all the main bases, Uber should have gone even further given its self-driving car killed Herzberg, said Bryant Walker Smith, an assistant law professor at the University of South Carolina who has been studying the issues affecting autonomous vehicles. In its most glaring omission, Uber didn’t accept responsibility for Herzberg’s death — the first involving a fully autonomous vehicle, he said.

  • Online hate is spreading, and Internet platforms can’t stop it

    Date published: 
    November 1, 2018

    "“The problem with broad and vague definitions is that it’s subject to including things like political speech and dissent, because one person’s view of what’s demeaning to a group could be another person’s view of political speech,” said Danielle Citron, a law professor at the University of Maryland and author of the book “Hate Crimes in Cyberspace.”"

  • Reporters fell into the ‘both sides’ trap while covering birthright citizenship

    Date published: 
    October 31, 2018

    "According to Margaret Hu, a professor at Washington and Lee Law School and an expert on immigration law, “we created an entire regime of exclusion as a result of the Chinese Exclusion Act.” Indeed, the very concept of an “undocumented” immigrant “didn’t come about until we had a document-based immigration system,” which was itself created as part of this broad effort to exclude Chinese nationals."

  • US midterms: Democrats look to big data to beat Trump

    Date published: 
    October 31, 2018

    "To Mr McLaughlin, targeting people by values such as “equality” or “tradition” is fine, but profiling their emotional state is not. As AI improves, he believes campaigns should steer clear of any technology that makes decisions that are unexplainable. “We do not want to unilaterally surrender capabilities to the right — nor do we want to behave as though the ends justify the means,” he says."

  • The Tinder-Bumble Feud: Dating Apps Fight Over Who Owns The Swipe

    Date published: 
    October 30, 2018

    ""You don't get a patent for saying 'cure dementia with a drug.' You have to say what the drug is," explains Daniel Nazer, a staff attorney at the Electronic Frontier Foundation.

    Nazer, with the EFF, says a few months ago he'd have bet on a win for Bumble — but because the legal standards in this area are constantly evolving, today, he's not so sure."
  • Florida man won't be compelled to reveal iPhone passcode, yet

    Date published: 
    October 27, 2018

    ""This case adds to the disagreement over how to analyze compelled decryption orders in the context of passcodes," said Riana Pfefferkorn, associate director of surveillance and cybersecurity at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society, in an email to The Register."

  • California agrees to delay enforcing net-neutrality law

    Date published: 
    October 26, 2018

    "“This isn’t a setback,” said Ryan Singel, a fellow at Center of Internet and Society at Stanford Law School, who supports the law. It was expected that the law would be put on hold, he said, “and it’s ready to go into effect once the federal decision comes down.”"

  • This Week’s Attempted Bombings Raise Alarms. But Experts Say It Doesn’t Mean the Country Is More Violent

    Date published: 
    October 26, 2018

    "Brian Nussbaum, a professor at the University of Albany who studies terrorism and cybersecurity, says waves of widespread violence come in “ideological bursts.”

    “It’s not like Weathermen Underground. They had an organized strategy,” he tells TIME. “Even the groups that are mobilizing more so than just being one or two people don’t really have the power to have effective campaigns.”"

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