Press

CIS in the news.

  • Fox News Faces Copyright Suit Over Ocasio-Cortez Photo

    Date published: 
    July 25, 2019

    "Annemarie Bridy, professor of law at the University of Idaho, said in a direct message via Twitter, “At first glance, it does not appear that Fox has a credible fair use claim.”

    “The use is commercial and non-transformative. The photo itself is not news; it’s just being used to illustrate a story about AOC. News publishers traditionally license this kind of use,” Bridy said."

  • Equifax to pay up to $700M in data breach settlement

    Date published: 
    July 25, 2019

    "Security experts said there's really no way to know, especially in the absence of third-party validation. "You cannot determine with certainty that the information will never wind up in the hands of people who are going to use it," said Ryan Calo, a law professor at the University of Washington."

  • US attorney general says encryption creates security risk

    Date published: 
    July 23, 2019

    "Gail Kent, Facebook’s global public policy lead on security, recently said that allowing the government’s ability to gain access to encrypted communications would jeopardize cybersecurity for millions of law-abiding people who rely on it. WhatsApp is owned by Facebook.

    “It’s impossible to create any backdoor that couldn’t be discovered, and exploited, by bad actors,” Kent said."

     

  • Barr Revives Encryption Debate, Calling on Tech Firms to Allow for Law Enforcement

    Date published: 
    July 23, 2019

    "Mr. Barr is assuming that the negative impacts of encryption on law enforcement investigations “far outweigh encryption’s benefits for protecting individuals, business and the nation,” said Riana Pfefferkorn, the associate director of surveillance and cybersecurity at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society.

    “That assumption has never been borne out by evidence in the form of actual, accurate numbers about encryption’s effect on law enforcement’s ability to solve crimes,” Ms. Pfefferkorn said."

     

  • Never-Googlers: Web users take the ultimate step to guard their data

    Date published: 
    July 23, 2019

    "Quitting Google is a major undertaking that may not be possible, said Jonathan Mayer, an assistant professor of computer science at Princeton University.

    “The reality is, you’re going to use these services whether intentionally or not,” he said. “It is exceedingly hard to control the data flows of these companies.”"

  • Facebook will have to pay a record-breaking fine for violating users’ privacy. But the FTC wanted more.

    Date published: 
    July 22, 2019

    "“It could be curtailed by a court decision, which might come down eight years down the line,” said Omer Tene, vice president at the International Association of Privacy Professionals. “Certainly a company like Facebook has the firepower to fight fire with fire and actually take the U.S. government all the way to the Supreme Court, and maybe once and for all settle the authority the FTC has in privacy and data security.”"

  • Ellucian Banner Security Flaw Draws Federal Concern

    Date published: 
    July 19, 2019

    "Scott Shackelford, professor of law and cybersecurity program chair at Indiana University at Bloomington, said it is not uncommon for organizations to take several months to release patches addressing security issues, particularly if they “don’t think it’s particularly troublesome.”

    Moving forward, Shackelford encouraged colleges and universities to pay attention when companies release updates and install them “as quickly as possible.”

  • 'Sony Research Award Program' Continues for Fourth Year

    Date published: 
    July 15, 2019

    ""Many technology companies have joined industry initiatives on AI ethics, but Sony has taken the extra step to support independent academic study on that subject," said Dr. Patrick Lin, Professor of Philosophy and Director for the Ethics & Emerging Sciences Group, California Polytechnic State University. "Not only does this show thought-leadership in ethics, but it's also a testament to Sony's commitment to social responsibility.""

  • Denver-area neighborhoods are installing license plate readers to record every vehicle that passes by

    Date published: 
    July 9, 2019

    "“We can’t begin to fathom how fast we’re moving to a ‘Star Trek’ world,” said Albert Gidari, consulting director of privacy at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society.

    The cameras themselves aren’t necessarily a violation of privacy, said Gidari, the Stanford privacy expert. They are collecting images of people traveling in public, where people implicitly give consent to being seen and photographed, he said.

  • Australia's anti-encryption laws being used to bypass journalist protections, expert says

    Date published: 
    July 8, 2019

    "This undermined protections granted to journalists under other national security legislation, said cybersecurity researcher Riana Pfefferkorn, an associate director of surveillance and cybersecurity at the Stanford Centre for Internet and Society.

    Data retention legislation passed in 2015 had a carve-out for journalists that required law enforcement to obtain a special journalist information warrant, but Pfefferkorn said in a personal submission to the review that the combination of the new powers meant the information warrant need not be obtained.

  • Expert: The AFP used our new anti-encryption laws to raid the ABC

    Date published: 
    July 8, 2019

    "As The Guardian has already noted, cybersecurity expert Riana Pfefferkorn has taken umbrage with the process, adding a personal submission to the parliamentary review, claiming that the AFP’s actions subverted the existing protections offered to journalists, and more accurately, that the new laws removed the need for a warrant.

  • Australia’s anti-encryption bill is allowing the government to openly spy on journalists

    Date published: 
    July 8, 2019

    "Riana Pfefferkorn, associate director of surveillance and cybersecurity at Stanford Center for Internet and Society, pointed out that this undermines the protection granted to journalists under other national security laws.

    The data retention legislation, in fact, had a niche for journalists that imposed law enforcement to have a specific warrant for journalists. In a personal submission to the review, Pfefferkorn said that the combination of the new powers de facto invalidates the need to obtain a specific warrant.

  • Seeing Is Believing

    Date published: 
    July 3, 2019

    "Riana Pfefferkorn is the associate director of surveillance and cybersecurity at Stanford’s Center for Internet and Society. She’s been at the forefront of what deepfakes will mean to the legal system. “I don’t think this is going to be as big and widespread thing as people fear it’s going to be,” she says. “But at the same time, there’s totally going to be stuff that none of us see coming.”

  • Stanford Team Aims at Alexa and Siri With a Privacy-Minded Alternative

    Date published: 
    June 14, 2019

    "It has been almost two decades since Google started to dominate internet search the way Microsoft dominated software for personal computers a generation earlier.

    Now computer scientists at Stanford University are warning about the consequences of a race to control what they believe will be the next key consumer technology market — virtual assistants like Amazon’s Alexa and Google Assistant.

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