Of Interest

  • Sorry, Google: California's self-driving car bill would prioritize unknown rival

    Date published: 
    January 27, 2016

    "Some carmakers, including Tesla, are building vehicles with increasingly sophisticated driver assistance systems. The other approach, favoured by Google, jumps over this so-called “mushy middle” of automation to truly driverless vehicles. “The key for these driverless vehicles is location, location, location,” says Bryant Walker Smith, a law professor at the University of South Carolina.

  • The Government Shouldn’t Distribute Child Pornography. Period.

    Author(s): 
    Elizabeth Joh
    Publication Date: 
    January 27, 2016
    Publication Type: 
    Other Writing

    Participating in the distribution of child pornography is a federal crime. But that’s exactly what the F.B.I. did in this case. In order to identify more than 1,000 people suspected of trading in child pornography, the F.B.I. operated a child pornography website for nearly two weeks.

  • Opinion: Forget about Safe Harbor. Modernize global privacy law instead

    Author(s): 
    Scott Shackelford
    Publication Date: 
    January 27, 2016
    Publication Type: 
    Other Writing

    There's a widening transatlantic divide regarding privacy rights that needs to be bridged – and soon.

    But instead of coming up with another version of the data transfer agreement between the US and European Union known as Safe Harbor, we need a new set of global standards to build a common vision of privacy rights in the Digital Age.

  • Government to Google to Pinterest (Past Event)

    February 10, 2016
    Stanford Law School

     

    IMPORTANT: THIS EVENT HAS BEEN RESCHEDULED TO FEBRUARY 10. 12:50PM-2:00PM

     

    RSVP is required for this free event. 

    Lunch time conversation with Mike Yang. 

  • How Human Do We Want Our Robots To Be?: A Future Tense Event Recap.

    Date published: 
    January 25, 2016

    "The central issue may come down to what Christine Rosen, senior editor of the New Atlantis, called “the Stepford Wife problem,” which she described as the probability that we’ll end up with emotional attachments to our robots. But Woodrow Hartzog, a law professor at Samford University and the owner of a Roomba nicknamed Rocko, argued that there’s nothing wrong with developing an emotional attachment to a robot.

  • Drone Lobbying Heats Up on Capitol Hill

    Date published: 
    January 24, 2016

    "“Now that there is so much interest and money in drones, everyone wants to get their say” said Ryan Calo, an assistant professor of law at the University of Washington who is focused on robotics. A bill under consideration in Congress “is a way for people who aren’t getting what they want out of the process or getting it fast enough to get their views injected.”"

  • Oakland’s Privacy Commission Could Lead Nation on Surveillance Oversight

    Date published: 
    January 22, 2016

    "“It’s really exciting,” said Catherine Crump, an assistant clinical professor at UC Berkeley’s law school, who has been following Oakland’s story.

    “It’s an example of a community trying to grasp hold of how technology is changing, and actually exert some control over the degree which people are going to be subject to surveillance and then in what ways,” she said.

  • Auto leaders lend advice on regulating future car tech

    Date published: 
    January 22, 2016

    "Bryant Walker Smith, an assistant professor of law at the University of South Carolina, went a bit further in depth with his advice.

    “The details matter but the broader social context determines how many of those details will be interpreted,” Smith said. “So states need to begin by closely auditing their existing laws, identifying all of the potential obstacles and impediments to particular technologies, in consultation with the developers, who should be doing the same thing.

  • FBI ran website sharing thousands of child porn images

    Date published: 
    January 21, 2016

    "“At some point, the government investigation becomes indistinguishable from the crime, and we should ask whether that’s OK,” said Elizabeth Joh, a University of California Davis law professor who has studied undercover investigations. “What’s crazy about it is who’s making the cost/benefit analysis on this? Who decides that this is the best method of identifying these people?”"

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