Of Interest

  • OmniCISA Pits DHS Against the FCC and FTC on User Privacy

    Author(s): 
    Jennifer Granick
    Publication Date: 
    December 15, 2015
    Publication Type: 
    Other Writing

    On Friday, Congress will vote on a mutated version of security threat sharing legislation that had previously passed through the House and Senate. These earlier versions would have permitted private companies to share with the federal government categories of data related to computer security threat signatures. Companies that did so would also receive legal immunity from liability under the Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA) and other privacy laws.

  • The Transatlantic Data War

    Author(s): 
    Henry Farrell
    Publication Date: 
    December 15, 2015
    Publication Type: 
    Other Writing

    Last October, the European Court of Justice struck down the Safe Harbor agreement, a 15-year-old transatlantic arrangement that permitted U.S. companies to transfer data, such as people’s Google-search histories, outside the EU.

  • What Will It Take to Build a Virtuous AI?

    Date published: 
    December 15, 2015

    "“I’d agree that AI is a very powerful tool, and some designs and uses can be better or worse than others,” says Patrick Lin, a philosopher at Cal Poly who studies the ethics of automation and artificial intelligence. But, he adds: “OpenAI says that it aims at ‘a good outcome for all’ and to ‘benefit humanity as a whole,’ but who gets to define what the good outcome is?”

  • Don’t Forget the Other Legal Issues in the 9/11 Trial

    Author(s): 
    Beth Van Schaack
    Publication Date: 
    December 14, 2015
    Publication Type: 
    Other Writing

    This post is the latest installment of our “Monday Reflections” feature, in which a different Just Security editor examines the big stories from the previous week or looks ahead to key developments on the horizon.

  • The 4 worst patents of 2015

    Date published: 
    December 14, 2015

    "To give just a sense of just how out of touch the law has become, I askedDaniel Nazer, an attorney with the Electronic Frontier Foundation, to highlight the worst patents he’s come across this year. Nazer, who holds the Mark Cuban Chair to Eliminate Stupid Patents (yes, really), had little trouble coming up with these four, culled from a monthly “Stupid Patent of the Month” post he writes for the EFF site.

    As Nazer says, “In a world with 400,000 software patents, everyone is an infringer.”"
  • Founder of Google’s Stealthy Surgical Robotics Project Speaks

    Date published: 
    December 14, 2015

    "Other robotics experts are not so sure. Ryan Calo is a law professor at the University of Washington, and teaches a class on Robotic Law and Policy. “The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved robotic surgery relatively quickly because it made an analogy between robotic surgery and laparoscopic surgery,” he says. Makers of robotic surgical systems claimed that their devices were essentially an extension of traditional laparoscopic instruments.

  • Net-Neutrality Proponents Warn of Loopholes

    Date published: 
    December 13, 2015

    "“If this isn’t addressed…it will send the signal that this kind of behavior is OK, and I think that will encourage other [Internet-access providers] to start zero rating their own television offerings,” said Barbara van Schewick, a Stanford Law School professor."

  • Will Fear Change the Internet? Self-Policing Has Already Started

    Date published: 
    December 13, 2015

    ""The Internet is moving away from a place where anyone can say anything and find any information they want," Jennifer Granick, director of Civil Liberties at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society, told NBC News. "My hypothesis is that the Internet will become more like TV.""

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