Of Interest

  • Crypto Summit 2.0: The weight of security: measuring the benefits of robust encryption (Past Event)

    March 30, 2016
    San Francisco

    Today, the debate over encryption is making headlines in nations around the world. Together, we’re working toward solutions at Crypto Summit 2.0.

    The first Crypto Summit, held in July 2015 in Washington, D.C., brought together technologists, lawyers, and policy professionals from different sectors. Since then leading experts have considered proposals that would legislate the future of encryption — and the future of privacy and security online.

  • RightsCon 2016: The Right to be Forgotten: Remembering Freedom of Expression (Past Event)

    March 30, 2016
    San Francisco
    What and whom should the Internet forget? Who should decide? Can search engines be trusted as the guardians and censors of the online world? How are individual interests best protected on the internet? How can we strike the balance between privacy and freedom of expression online? Has privacy won the draw, in the internet information age?
  • Terrain may alter future encryption-security fights

    Date published: 
    March 29, 2016

    "“The entire process is confined to executive-branch agencies. It is not a creature of Congress. As to whether a company could proactively seek review of an exploit, I doubt that there is a provision for that,” said Riana Pfefferkorn, a fellow at The Center for Internet and Society at Stanford Law School."

  • Round One Goes to the FBI, But the Crypto War Isn’t Over

    Date published: 
    April 11, 2016

    "Facing increasingly sophisticated technology, the government has turned toward legalized hacking to defeat digital security measures, said Riana Pfefferkorn of the Stanford Center for Internet and Society. In order to catch pedophiles masking their identities using Tor, a program first built for the U.S.

  • Exlusive: Honda and Takata's stealth airbag fix

    Date published: 
    March 29, 2016

    "Bryant Walker Smith, a law professor at the University of South Carolina and an expert in automotive safety and regulation said that Honda could make an argument that "it’s always improving its products – for instance, that air bags are getting safer every year,” he said. “I’m not sure how a jury would approach or examine that.”"

  • FBI Hacks Into San Bernardino Shooter's iPhone Without Apple's Help, Drops Case

    Date published: 
    March 28, 2016

    "“I think Apple will fight as hard as they can, but the moment the FBI withdraws the motion, Apple will have a difficult time finding anything out,” said Riana Pfefferkorn, a fellow at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society who filed an amicus ‘friend of the court’ brief in the case supporting Apple."

  • U.S. Says It Has Unlocked iPhone Without Apple

    Date published: 
    March 28, 2016

    "“Courts should be skeptical going forward when the government claims it has no other option besides compelling a device maker’s assistance,” said Riana Pfefferkorn, a cryptography fellow at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society.

    “Now that the F.B.I. has accessed this iPhone, it should disclose the method for doing so to Apple,” she added. “Apple ought to have the chance to fix that security issue, which likely affects many other iPhones.”"

  • How RightsCon brings press freedom, technology and social change together

    Author(s): 
    Geoffrey King
    Publication Date: 
    March 28, 2016
    Publication Type: 
    Other Writing

    This week in San Francisco, CPJ's Technology and Advocacy teams will participate in RightsCon 2016, an annual conference focusing on human rights and technology. Organized by digital rights group Access Now, RightsCon is one of the most important regular gatherings on technology policy, and the conference has been the site of effective discussions around issues that affect journalists and journalism. We expect this year to be no different.

  • VENUE Act aims to lessen ease of filing patent lawsuits in Eastern District of Texas

    Date published: 
    March 28, 2016

    "“The VENUE Act would make it harder for companies to file a suit in districts that don’t have meaningful connection to the suit,” Daniel Nazer, staff attorney with the Electronic Frontier Foundation and Mark Cuban Chair to Eliminate Stupid Patents, told the Southeast Texas Record. “This bill is really about making sure disputes are filed somewhere that makes sense.”"

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