Of Interest

  • First White House AI workshop focuses on how machines (plus humans) will change government

    Date published: 
    May 24, 2016

    "Intelligent machines won’t be ruling the world anytime soon – but what happens when they turn you down for a loan, crash your car or discriminate against you because of your race or gender?

    On one level, the answer is simple: “It depends,” says Bryant Walker Smith, a law professor at the University of South Carolina who specializes in the issues raised by autonomous vehicles."

  • Artificial Intelligence: Law and Policy

    The University of Washington School of Law is delighted to announce a public workshop on the law and policy of artificial intelligence, co-hosted by the White House and UW’s Tech Policy Lab. The event places leading artificial intelligence experts from academia and industry in conversation with government officials interested in developing a wise and effective policy framework for this increasingly important technology. 

  • Facebook, Congress and the First Amendment

    The Facebook Trending Topics controversy has been analyzed from many angles, but there's been virtually no attention paid to the single most troubling aspect of the story: a Senate inquiry into Facebook's editorial decision-making process. My Slate column on the issue is here.

  • Spying on Muslims is bad policy

    Author(s): 
    Brian Nussbaum
    Publication Date: 
    May 23, 2016
    Publication Type: 
    Other Writing

    During the presidential primary, U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz suggested increased surveillance and policing of Muslim neighborhoods in the United States. This suggestion has rightly provoked the ire of many people across the political spectrum. Even more than being out of step with American values, these strategies are counterproductive to good counterterrorism policy.

  • Safe or Good? We All Have Choices to Make

    Date published: 
    May 23, 2016

    "In contrast, courts have not forced individuals to reveal the passcodes used to secure their mobile devices.[2] What gives? Albert Gidari, the director of privacy at Stanford Law School’s Center for Internet and Society, explains that the Fifth Amendment protects thoughts, not things: “Unlike disclosing passcodes, you are not compelled to speak or say what’s ‘in your mind’ to law enforcement,” Gidari said.

  • White House to come to UW, engage in discussions on artificial intelligence and law

    Date published: 
    May 23, 2016

    "In relation to the role of government in AI, Ryan Calo, assistant law professor at the UW and faculty director of the Tech Policy Lab, and one of the speakers, suggests that the government isn’t trying to control the use of AI, but realizes its technological significance.

    “The White House realizes that people must channel resources to research AI and to remain globally competitive,” Calo said. 

  • White House, University of Washington Co-host Artificial Intelligence Workshop

    Date published: 
    May 23, 2016

    "UW Law Professor Ryan Calo, says imagine you’ve been placed on no-fly list.

    “It’s not as though there’s some dossier that you could look at and see exactly what’s going on. It’s the result of artificial intelligence in that sense, combing through lots of information and spitting out a likelihood that you’re a problem,” he said. “How do you appeal that? What recourse do you have?”

  • Apple’s Touch ID rules may be designed to protect human rights

    Date published: 
    May 23, 2016

    "I spoke to Geoffrey King, the technology program coordinator at the Committee to Protect Journalists, a group devoted to reducing the danger to reporters worldwide and publicizing jailed and missing writers. Journalists and activists often receive the brunt of a government’s worst behavior in the interests in shutting them up and shutting them down. “We protect the people who anger everybody else,” King noted.

  • Online tracking: A 1-million-site measurement and analysis

    Author(s): 
    Arvind Narayanan
    Publication Date: 
    May 22, 2016
    Publication Type: 
    Academic Writing

    Online tracking: A 1-million-site measurement and analysis is the largest and most detailed measurement of online tracking to date. We measure stateful (cookie-based) and stateless (fingerprinting-based) tracking, the effect of browser privacy tools, and "cookie syncing". 

    This measurement is made possible by our web measurement tool OpenWPM, a mature platform that enables fully automated web crawls using a full-fledged and instrumented browser.

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