Of Interest

  • SAN BERNARDINO SHOOTING: Apple opposes order to unlock shooter's iPhone

    Date published: 
    February 18, 2016

    "If Apple is forced to comply with the order, it could have unintended consequences for users of its devices, and could change international regard for cyber-security issues involving the American company, said Riana Pfefferkorn, a fellow at The Center for Internet and Society at Stanford Law School.

    "If Apple agrees to write a special code for the U.S. government, what about China and Russia and other countries? That could deal a policy blow to America's stance that we are distinct in this area," she said in a telephone interview.

  • Apple stands up for consumers. Alone

    Date published: 
    February 18, 2016

    "Technology consultant Richard Forno, a veteran in the security industry and one who has worked for the government as well, pointed out that while the FBI is demanding a backdoor, "the NSA director Admiral Mike Rogers has already stated publicly there is no need for such backdoors or law enforcement access, and that strong internet security features are more of a benefit than risk to society"."

  • Apple reportedly enlists aid of free-speech attorneys in encryption battle

    Date published: 
    February 18, 2016

    "As for the potential of a free-speech argument, Reuters spoke with cryptology expert Riana Pfefferkorn, a fellow at Stanford University's Center for Internet and Society, who said Apple could assert the FBI's request for a software workaround as tantamount to unlawful compelled speech. Since Apple contends such forensics tools do not currently exist, it would be forced to write computer code specifically for that purpose, Pfefferkorn said."

  • Apple-FBI fight over iPhone encryption pits privacy against national security

    Date published: 
    February 18, 2016

    ""This is a new frontier," said Jennifer Granick, director of civil liberties at Stanford Law School's Center for Internet and Society. "I know of no other statutory provision that would arguably create an obligation for device manufacturers to help out the government."

    Apple may not have fought orders in the past because "it was easy for Apple to give the data," she said.

    "But the architecture of the phones changed," she said. "This is about Apple creating a new forensic version of its software to do the job the FBI wants it to do."

  • Apple Letter on iPhone Security Draws Muted Tech Industry Response

    Date published: 
    February 18, 2016

    "“The issue is of monumental importance, not only to the government and Apple but to the other technology giants as well,” said Tom Rubin, a former attorney for Microsoft and the United States Department of Justice, who is now a law lecturer at Harvard University. “Those companies are undoubtedly following the case intently, praying that it creates a good precedent and breathing a sigh of relief that it’s not them in the spotlight.”"

  • New Alliances in Cybersecurity, Human Rights and Internet Governance (Past Event)

    February 17, 2016
    Stanford University

    On Wednesday, February 17, The Center on Democracy, Development and the Rule of Law at Stanford, The Center for International Governance Innovation, and the Research Advisory Network of the Global Commission on Internet Governance will present an all-day conference entitled "New Alliances in Cybersecurity, Human Rights and Internet Governance." The conference will discuss the challenges of creating a regime of internet governance that pays attention to security and human rights in the digital context.

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