Of Interest

  • Facebook Privacy Woes Make Little Impact On Site’s Popularity

    Date published: 
    May 26, 2010

    Ryan Calo, a residential fellow at the Center for Internet & Society, is quoted on changes to Facebook's privacy policies. Brian Womack of Bloomberg reports:

    Facebook Inc. has rankled politicians from Amsterdam to Washington for failing to protect personal privacy. Yet for all the criticism, users are flocking apace to the world’s largest social network.

  • Facebook Unveils New, Simpler Privacy Settings

    Date published: 
    May 26, 2010

    Ryan Calo, a residential fellow at the Center for Internet & Society, talks to David Louie of KGO News about recent changes to Facebook's privacy settings, which makes them easier for users of the social network to set:

    Palo Alto-based Facebook Tuesday announced changes to its privacy settings. The social networking website had been facing growing criticism from Capitol Hill to Main Street.

  • Free Speech vs. Hate Speech On Facebook

    Date published: 
    May 20, 2010

    Ryan Calo, a residential fellow at the Center for Internet & Society, is quoted in this article on Facebook's monitoring of potentially offensive content on a global platform. Helen A.S. Popkin of MSNBC filed this story:

    Despite its 400 million-plus active users, Facebook seems like it could really use a friend.

  • Comm Daily(R) Notebook

    Date published: 
    May 6, 2010

    Professor Barbara van Schewick is quoted in this article on net neutrality and broadband regulation:

  • Robots and Privacy

    Author(s): 
    Ryan Calo
    Publication Date: 
    May 4, 2010
    Publication Type: 
    Academic Writing

    Robots and Privacy, in ROBOT ETHICS: THE ETHICAL AND SOCIAL IMPLICATIONS OF ROBOTICS (Patrick Lin et al, eds.) (MIT Press 2012)

  • The Case for Online Obscurity

    Author(s): 
    Woodrow Hartzog
    Publication Date: 
    May 3, 2010
    Publication Type: 
    Academic Writing

    On the Internet, obscure information has a minimal risk of being discovered or understood by unintended recipients. Empirical research demonstrates that Internet users rely on obscurity perhaps more than anything else to protect their privacy. Yet, online obscurity has been largely ignored by courts and lawmakers. In this article, we argue that obscurity is a critical component of online privacy, but it has not been embraced by courts and lawmakers because it has never been adequately defined or conceptualized.

  • Robot Rules

    Date published: 
    May 1, 2010

    Ryan Calo, a residential fellow at the Center for Internet & Society, is quoted on robotics and liability issues. Richard Acello of the ABA Journal filed this story:

    Robots may now be confined to sweeping living rooms and working assembly lines, but futurists and attorneys agree they are destined to take on a much greater role soon. Bill Gates has compared the development of robots to the earliest personal computers in the 1970s.

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