Of Interest

  • Wiretap Numbers Still Don't Add Up

    Earlier this year, I wrote that the wiretap numbers reported by the Administrative Office (AO) of the US Courts in its 2014 Wiretap Report and those disclosed in transparency reports by the major telecommunications companies just didn’t add up. While the AO reported 3554 wiretaps in 2014, the four major U.S. carriers reported 10,712 wiretaps implemented for the same period -- a threefold discrepancy.

  • 'A classic commons problem': Publishers are going notifications crazy

    Date published: 
    November 29, 2016

    "Publishers have quickly realized the power of mobile notifications in drawing people back to content, so naturally they’re at risk of overdoing it.

    “This is a classic commons problem,” said Andrew McLaughlin, a former partner at Betaworks. “It’s a space where if everybody behaves badly, everything gets trashed.”"

  • Congress Is About to Expand Government Hacking Powers

    Date published: 
    November 29, 2016

    "Woodrow Hartzog, a law professor at Samford University who specializes in privacy law, says the history of computer crime law shows that vague language can lead to unintended consequences as technology evolves. “Even slight vagaries or miscalculations can result in dramatic expansions of power,” he says, citing language in the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, passed in 1986, that has created “an incredible amount of confusion” over what constitutes a crime.

  • Alleged Kidnapping Raises Questions About Online Harassment

    Date published: 
    November 29, 2016

    ""We often see people who torment domestic partners will torment them and terrorize them with any tool they have, and that is on and offline," University of Maryland Professor of Law Danielle Citron told ATTN:. "It’s devastating but I’m not surprised."

    "The truth about threats is they have to be targeted at a specific person, or clear from the context that it’s targeted at a specific person and implying and suggesting that physical violence is next," Citron said.

  • Some pervert cyberflashed me on the subway—And I have my iPhone to thank

    Date published: 
    November 29, 2016

    "Flashing someone is illegal, but the cyber equivalent isn’t, said Danielle Citron, a professor of law at the University of Maryland, who has written a book on cyberstalking.

    In order for what happened to me to be considered a crime—harassment—it would have to be “repeated and persistent,” according to Citron. A standard that two lewd pics probably doesn’t meet.

  • Five Lessons From the Rise of Bodycams

    Author(s): 
    Elizabeth Joh
    Publication Date: 
    November 28, 2016
    Publication Type: 
    Other Writing

    More than two years after Ferguson became a hashtag, spawned a movement, and drew national attention to problems about police accountability, the most tangible reform has been the spread of police body cameras. Their use seemed like a clear solution to problems of trust and oversight, but the reality hasn’t been that simple. Body cameras have introduced new problems of their own. How can we do better when the next new police technology arrives? Here are five things to keep in mind.

  • Facebook Must Stay Out of China

    Author(s): 
    Andrew McLaughlin
    Publication Date: 
    November 28, 2016
    Publication Type: 
    Other Writing

    Andrew McLaughlin, technology executive:

    Though it has been evident for years that Mark Zuckerberg really, really wants Facebook to operate in China, I’m genuinely surprised that the company appears, finally, to have made the decision to do it.

    I’m surprised for two big reasons:

  • Law school administrators would like al-Qaeda to go after U.S. News & World Report. This is why.

    Author(s): 
    Henry Farrell
    Publication Date: 
    November 28, 2016
    Publication Type: 
    Other Writing

    Wendy Nelson Espeland and Michael Sauder’s new book, “Engines of Anxiety,” explains how law schools try to game the U.S. News & World Report’s academic rankings to attract students. I interviewed them by email to understand why these rankings are so important, and what law schools do to try to improve their rating.

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