Of Interest

  • It's Too Complicated: How the Internet Upends Katz, Smith, and Electronic Surveillance Law

    Author(s): 
    Stephanie Pell
    Publication Date: 
    June 7, 2016
    Publication Type: 
    Other Writing

    For more than forty years, electronic surveillance law in the United States developed under constitutional and statutory regimes that, given the technology of the day, distinguished content from metadata with ease and certainty. The stability of these legal regimes and the distinctions they facilitated was enabled by the relative stability of these types of data in the traditional telephone network and their obviousness to users. But what happens to these legal frameworks when they confront the Internet?

  • Online anti-Semitism: Difficult to Fight, but Even Harder to Quantify

    Date published: 
    June 7, 2016

    "Danielle Citron, a professor of law at the University of Maryland and an expert on online harassment, is not sure whether online anti-Semitism is spreading or simply drawing more attention. “What I can say is that it’s become more mainstream,” she notes. “It is no longer hidden in the dark corners of the internet like it once was. We are now seeing it on very mainstream platforms like Facebook and Twitter.”

  • Luiz Fernando Moncau Joins Stanford Center for Internet and Society as Intermediary Liability Fellow

    The Center for Internet and Society (CIS) at Stanford Law School has appointed Luiz Fernando Marrey Moncau as Intermediary Liability Fellow. In this role at CIS, Moncau will continue his longstanding work promoting strong and well-crafted intermediary liability laws that advance the rights and freedoms of Internet users. He will start in July 2016, working with Intermediary Liability Director Daphne Keller

  • EU, U.S. sign data privacy umbrella agreement

    Date published: 
    June 6, 2016

    "Industry professionals warn of the economic consequences that the lack of certainty involving data sharing agreements could create. International Association of Privacy Professionals (IAPP) Vice President of Research and Education Omer Tene said the debate involving these agreements will “cast doubt on the viability of the existing framework and foments an extended period of uncertainty and risk for businesses in the US and EU.”"

  • Why is everyone covering up their laptop cameras?

    Date published: 
    June 6, 2016

    "Yet not everyone is on the camera-covering bandwagon. Brian Pascal, a privacy expert who has worked for Stanford and Palantir Technologies says a cost-benefit analysis led him conclude he’d rather have a usable camera, which he can use to record his son. But he acknowledged such stickers are a way for people signal that they too worry about Big Brother.

    “Security actions without threat modelling are just performative,” said Pascal."

  • Will the Constitution Protect Your Next Smartphone?

    Date published: 
    June 3, 2016

    "But these decisions don’t necessarily mean the debate over the Fifth Amendment and fingerprint readers is all wrapped up, says Al Gidari, a technology lawyer and the director of privacy at Stanford University’s Center for Internet and Society.

  • The U.S. wants to maintain cross-border data flows. That may be tough.

    Author(s): 
    Henry Farrell
    Publication Date: 
    June 2, 2016
    Publication Type: 
    Other Writing

    "Karen Kornbluh, the former U.S. ambassador to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), has a new cyber brief making the case for open cross-border data flows at the Council on Foreign Relations website (full disclosure: I authored an earlier brief in this series). Kornbluh argues that foreign jurisdictions pose an increasing threat to open flows of data across networks such as the Internet.

  • Outing is totally still a thing, people

    Date published: 
    June 3, 2016

    "“The fact is we have made some important progress with regard to the LGBT community; what 50 years ago was a crime is now in some states protected by antidiscrimination law. They have the right to marry, that’s a lot of progress,” said Danielle Citron, a University of Maryland law professor. “But prejudices continue. The suggestion that bigotry and hate is going to somehow disappear because the law has changed is out of touch with reality, and outing someone for being LGBT can still do damage.”"

  • A First Amendment For Social Platforms

    Author(s): 
    Nabiha Syed
    Publication Date: 
    June 2, 2016
    Publication Type: 
    Other Writing

    The great 21st-century platforms — Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Snapchat, and the rest — have this year found themselves in the middle of the speech wars. Twitter is struggling to contain vile trolling and harassment, and Facebook has gotten scalded on the little toe it dipped into curating journalism.

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