Of Interest

  • Google pledges not to use AI for weapons or surveillance

    Date published: 
    June 11, 2018

    "Peter Asaro, vice chairman of the International Committee for Robot Arms Control, said this week that Google's backing off from the project was good news because it slows down a potential AI arms race over autonomous weapons systems. What's more, letting the contract expire was fundamental to Google's business model, which relies on gathering mass amounts of user data, he said.

    "They're a company that's very much aware of their image in the public conscious," he said. "They want people to trust them and trust them with their data.""

  • Are any encrypted messaging apps fail-safe? Subjects of Mueller’s investigation are about to find out.

    Date published: 
    June 8, 2018

    "Encryption is the best tool people have for defending against hackers, cybercriminals and government surveillance, said Riana Pfefferkorn, a cryptography fellow at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society. Still, “your communications encryption choices are only worth as much as the trustworthiness of the people you're talking to,” she said.

  • White House says its federal agencies can’t keep track of their own data

    Date published: 
    June 8, 2018

    "University of Maryland, Baltimore County's cybersecurity graduate program director Richard Forno echoed Williams' analysis and said even a simple Google search could cull results that warned about our dire state of federal cybersecurity decades earlier.

    "Government reports like this just literally say the same thing year after year: 'here are a couple of recommendations on how we can fix things' and a year goes by, and it says the exact same thing," Forno said.

  • Facebook is hiring 'news credibility specialists' — after saying it didn't want to be in the business of judging news trustworthiness

    Date published: 
    June 8, 2018

    "Facebook has a responsibility to be transparent about how it plans to evaluate news organizations, said Morgan Weiland, an attorney and PhD candidate at Stanford whose research focuses on how the big tech platform companies are handling their role in distributing news.

    "If they're going to build out a team like this, they need to be more explicit about how they understand their role or what kind of company they see themselves as," Weiland said.

    She continued: "They're giving us a lot of mixed signals.""

  • How can we train AI to be good? (Past Event)

    June 13, 2018
    Denmark

    The ongoing development and ever-increasing sophistication of artificial intelligence (AI) is giving rise to some fundamental ethical questions: Will machine-made decisions always be transparent and stay within human-defined parameters? To what extent can users retain control over intelligent algorithms? Is it possible to imbue self-learning systems with a sense of morality? And who decides what moral values these systems should to follow anyway?

  • Google just released a set of ethical principles about how it will use AI technology

    Date published: 
    June 7, 2018

    "Pichai's pledge regarding weapons was "really strong," Peter Asaro, associate professor of media studies at the New School in New York, told Business Insider. Asaro coauthor a letter to Google's managementlast month, signed by hundreds of academics and researchers, demanding that Google cease developing military technologies as well as calling for a ban on authonomous weapons.

  • Google Renounces AI Weapons; Will Still Work With Military

    Date published: 
    June 7, 2018

    "The principles about surveillance were not specific enough, according to Peter Asaro, an associate professor at The New School who organized a letter from academics against Project Maven.

    "The international norms surrounding espionage, cyberoperations, mass information surveillance, and even drone surveillance are all contested and debated in the international sphere," he said. "Ultimately, how the company enacts these principles is what will matter more than statements such as this.""

Pages

Subscribe to Of Interest