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The Code of Cyberspace

The Code of Cyberspace
Congress should help artists get paid without delivering the Internet. The Internet will not cause the "withering away of the state." If we"re not careful, government could instead wither the Net.
Industry Standard, December 6, 1999

Filtering Content

Filtering Content
In this world where business regulates instead of government, what do we do when business goes too far?
Industry Standard, October, 1999

Thinking Different(ly)

Thinking Different(ly)
Our national identity is tied to the ideals of the First Amendment. And yet we treat it as obvious that in corporate space, the Bolsheviks rule.
Industry Standard, September, 1999

Broadband Blackmail

Broadband Blackmail
Should someone pick your ISP for you? Code is thus limiting competition. The network is being designed to restrict ISP choice, and thereby lock broadband customers to the cable operator"s local broadband network.
Industry Standard, June, 1999

Coding Privacy

Coding Privacy
After years of inaction, Congress is finally coming to see that privacy on the Internet won"t take care of itself. The mystery isn"t that self-regulation failed\; the mystery is why anyone thought it would succeed.
Industry Standard, May, 1999

The Problem with Patents

The Problem with Patents
A patent is a form of regulation. It is a government-granted monopoly - an exclusive right backed by the power of the state. This monopoly is granted by a bureaucrat - a well-meaning, hardworking bureaucrat no doubt, but a bureaucrat nonetheless.
Industry Standard, April 23, 1999

The Code is the Law

The Code is the Law
The single most significant change in the politics of cyberspace is the coming of age of this simple idea: The code is law. The architectures of cyberspace are as important as the law in defining and defeating the liberties of the Net.
Industry Standard, April 9, 1999

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