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Being FAIR: The Irony of Anti-Gay Cases

In the decade-and-a-half since the infamous decision in Bowers v. Hardwick, the Supreme Court again ruled against gays in two major cases. The first of these was Hurley, in which Irish-American gays sought the right to march alongside other Irish-Americans in the St. Patrick's Day Parade in Boston. And more recently, in Dale, in which a gay scoutmaster fought to retain his position in the Boy Scouts of America. In both those cases, gays lost, the Court ruling in favor of an association's right to discriminate.

Defending Justice Thomas

In an interview on Meet the Press, Senator Harry Reid, the new leader of the Democrats in the Senate, refers to Justice Thomas as an "embarrassment." He goes on:

I think that his opinions are poorly written. I just don't think that he's done a good job as a Supreme Court justice.

Bad News Friday continues past election

A GOP aide owned up today to authoring a provision in a new law that would allow lawmakers to look at any American's income tax return. While the issue has been with us for more than a week--with all sides denying any knowledge as to who authored that provision--we finally get someone to own up to it--on a Friday, of course.

Is Arnold the Manchurian Candidate?

Ahnold.jpgIt has just come to my attnetion that the Governator owes allegiance to Old Europe! The SF Chronicle reported last year that A.S. kept his Austrian citizenship when he naturalized as an American.

A setback in Kahle v. Ashcroft

So the district court has granted the government's motion to dismiss in Kahle v. Ashcroft. Here's the order.

We're going to fight on to the Ninth Circuit, which is where the game was bound to be decided anyway. More comments coming soon on the district court's order.

A setback in Kahle v. Ashcroft

So the district court has granted the government's motion to dismiss in Kahle v. Ashcroft. Here's the order.

We're going to fight on to the Ninth Circuit, which is where the game was bound to be decided anyway. More comments coming soon on the district court's order.

Arbitraging iTunes?

promoipodsilo10262004.jpgApple's price for downloads varies by region--from $0.83 to $1.52. This would suggest a possibility of arbitrage, but Apple's technology eliminates the possibility of trading songs (unless the technology is hacked). The price differential would also suggest the possibility of masquerading as a Canadian even if one is in Britain or the U.S.

Drop Origami, Not Bombs

Origami Crane.jpgOn Sunday, Thailand will seek to improve relations with its Muslim minority by releasing origami birds over the Muslim region.

It's hard to know how it will be received, but I have to applaud the creativity in the approach.

From the Wall Street Journal in an article by Peter Fritsch:

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