Blog

Talking about Tech, Disinformation, & Trust in DC

October is 'National Cybersecurity Awareness Month' in the United States.  As many of you know, this already rather interdisciplinary field of 'cyber' has grown again over the past year or so --- now often encompassing issues like so-called 'fake news', disinformation, data analytics, and other current issues that further demonstrate some of the consequences resulting from the convergence of technology, adversaries, and society. Read more about Talking about Tech, Disinformation, & Trust in DC

Stanford Law School Appoints Joan Barata as Consulting Intermediary Liability Fellow at the Center for Internet and Society

Stanford Law School today announced the appointment of the freedom of expression, freedom of information, and media regulation international expert Joan Barata Mir as the Consulting Intermediary Liability Fellow at the Center for Internet and Society (CIS). Barata will pursue international and comparative approaches to intermediary obligations, focusing particularly on the implications vis-à-vis the exercise of the rights to freedom of expression and freedom of information. Read more about Stanford Law School Appoints Joan Barata as Consulting Intermediary Liability Fellow at the Center for Internet and Society

Proposed Australian Bill Would Threaten Computer Security for Everybody

Today was the deadline for the public to submit comments on the Australian government's draft Assistance and Access Bill 2018. The proposed legislation drew sharp criticism from numerous tech companies and civil society groups, in Australia and elsewhere, for the threats it poses to computer security, human rights, due process, and transparency. Read more about Proposed Australian Bill Would Threaten Computer Security for Everybody

New Whitepaper: Security Risks of Government Hacking

Today, CIS is publishing a whitepaper called “Security Risks of Government Hacking.” Also called “equipment interference” or “lawful hacking,” government hacking allows investigators to exploit hardware and software vulnerabilities to gain remote access to target computers. We hope our new publication will make a valuable contribution to policy discussions about this important topic. Read more about New Whitepaper: Security Risks of Government Hacking

Stanford Law School Appoints Judge Stephen Smith as Director of Fourth Amendment & Open Courts at the Center for Internet and Society

Stanford Law School today announced the appointment of retired Federal Judge Stephen Wm. Smith as Director, Fourth Amendment & Open Courts at the Center for Internet and Society (CIS). Smith will focus on the constitutionality of digital search and surveillance, as well as public access to court records authorizing those investigative techniques. Read more about Stanford Law School Appoints Judge Stephen Smith as Director of Fourth Amendment & Open Courts at the Center for Internet and Society

Tool Without A Handle: Tools and the Search for Meaning

“Tool Without A Handle”: Tools and the Search for Meaning

In a New York Times review of Edward Tenner’s book The Efficiency Paradox, Gal Beckerman observes that a key point is not simply to watch how much time we spend using technology, but to remember that “the tools we’ve invented to improve our lives are just that, tools, to be picked up and put down. We wield them.”

Which pretty succinctly states the main point of this entire series of blog posts: that human agency matters. Or, perhaps more directly, that while we all know human agency matters, we all too frequently overlook that point. This post (on Labor Day, 2018) thus asks what is the real value of human agency? By identifying value in it, I hope to set the stage for future posts on the urgency of fostering greater awareness of it. Read more about Tool Without A Handle: Tools and the Search for Meaning

Pages

Subscribe to Stanford CIS Blog