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Time to Reform the FISA Amendments Act Section 702

I've written a lot about the problems with the FISA Amendments Act and section 702, which is the legal basis for the PRISM surveillance program and involves warrantless collection of communications contents via targeting non-U.S. individuals or entities reasonably believed to be located abroad.

Important FAA Amendments Need Public Support Read more » about Time to Reform the FISA Amendments Act Section 702

Don’t Close Your Eyes to Surveillance Dangers: A Response to Richard Epstein

Yesterday, Professor Richard Epstein wrote a post for Just Security recommending unmodified continuation of the NSA’s bulk phone records collection. Today, I responded to his post, and explained why I think Richard's position is a surprising divergence from what I understand his values to be. Read more » about Don’t Close Your Eyes to Surveillance Dangers: A Response to Richard Epstein

Told Ya So: NSA's Collection Of Metadata Is Screamingly Illegal

Yesterday's report from the independent Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board, or PCLOB, confirms what Christopher Sprigman and I said back in June of last year in our New York Times Op Ed “The Criminal NSA”. The NSA’s telephone record metadata program, in which it collects the calling records of almost everyone inside the United States, is illegal. Amend that: it’s screamingly illegal. Flat out. Read more » about Told Ya So: NSA's Collection Of Metadata Is Screamingly Illegal

Spanish Court Orders an ISP to Disconnect a Copyright Infringer

In a recent ruling issued by the 15th Section of the Barcelona Court of Appeals – a Section specializing on IP – the Spanish ISP R Cable y Telecomunicaciones Galicia has been ordered to suspend, immediately and for good, the Internet connection of a user who engaged in copyright infringing file sharing. The text of the ruling (in Spanish) is available here (PDF). This is the first ruling of this kind in Spain. Read more » about Spanish Court Orders an ISP to Disconnect a Copyright Infringer

Bad news from the world of fracking and, even more importantly, corporate control of information

A few days ago, the hydraulic fracturing (“fracking”) industry was able to successfully lobby (via Halliburton) to weaken North Carolina's proposed fracking information access rules. The result could be that trade secrets – that information that is commercially valuable because it is not publicly known -- will be difficult to access not only for the public, but even for the North Carolina Mining and Energy Commission, charged with writing and enforcing the regulations for fracking. Read more » about Bad news from the world of fracking and, even more importantly, corporate control of information

Meeting of the Stanford Intermediary Liability Lab with Eric Goldman

The next meeting of the Stanford Intermediary Liability Lab (SILLab) will take place on Thursday, January 16 at 4pm in Room 230 at Stanford Law School.
 
Professor Eric Goldman from Santa Clara Law School will join us for an informal discussion about intermediary liability. Professor Goldman is one of the major intermediary liability experts in the US and runs a well known blog dedicated to intermediary liability and Internet law at http://blog.ericgoldman.org.
 

Changes to Export Control Arrangement Apply to Computer Exploits and More

Last month, changes to the Wassenaar Arrangement on Export Controls for Conventional Arms and Dual-Use Goods and Technologies (“Wassenaar Arrangement”) placed “zero-days”, other computer exploits, and potentially more categories of software under this multilateral export control regime. These changes take place following reports that the U.S. government purchases “zero day” computer security vulnerabilities—previously unknown exploits—for use by the NSA’s targeted hacking team. Read more » about Changes to Export Control Arrangement Apply to Computer Exploits and More

2013: The Year of Privacy

If there ever was a “year of privacy,” surely it was 2013. A year that ends with dictionary.com selecting “privacy” as “word of the year;” with privacy making front-page headlines in The New York Times and The Washington Post—not to mention The Guardian—on a weekly, indeed almost daily, basis; with cross-Atlantic ties stretched to the limit over privacy issues, the UN passing a privacy resolution and armies of lobbyists spinning BCRs and Do-Not-Track in Washington bars and Brussels cafes—ladies and gentlemen, 2013 was the year of privacy. Read more » about 2013: The Year of Privacy

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