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Spanish Court Criminalizes Linking to Copyright Infringing Materials and Reverses Consolidated Case Law

As we reported a few days ago, the recent Spanish copyright reform granted enhanced powers to the Spanish Copyright Commission to target websites providing links to infringing works in a purposeful and massive way. Recently, the Criminal Court of Appeal of Castellón has given a first judicial implementation to this principle and departed from a long-standing judicial tradition. Read more » about Spanish Court Criminalizes Linking to Copyright Infringing Materials and Reverses Consolidated Case Law

What to look for in this week's network neutrality announcement

This week, FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler will circulate a draft of the Open Internet rules to his fellow Commissioners. According to news reports, the Chairman will propose to reclassify Internet access as a “telecommunications service” and adopt network neutrality rules under Title II of the Communications Act. If that is true, this is excellent news and a vital step in the right direction. After the D.C. Circuit’s decision last January, this is the only way to adopt meaningful network neutrality rules that will be upheld in court. The FCC will vote on the proposal on February 26th. Read more » about What to look for in this week's network neutrality announcement

When Algorithmic Surveillance Becomes Structural Surveillance

A recent Wall Street Journal article revealed an ongoing DEA program designed to use automated license plate readers to build a real-time database of vehicle movement throughout the United States. This database would also store this data, giving government agencies the ability to retroactively track the movements of millions of Americans. As we've seen with similar programs, the scope of the effort will inevitably begin to creep. Read more » about When Algorithmic Surveillance Becomes Structural Surveillance

36 Leading Scholars to Federal Officials: Only the FCC Can Protect the Open Internet

Today, 36 leading scholars published a letter stating that the only way to protect network neutrality is for the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to adopt Open Internet rules under Title II of the Communications Act. The letter represents an unprecedented display of support for a bright-line ban on fees for any kind of preferential treatment (“paid prioritization”) by the nation's leading academics.  Read more » about 36 Leading Scholars to Federal Officials: Only the FCC Can Protect the Open Internet

Seven Reasons the New GOP Bill Will Not Give Us Net Neutrality

After a year of debates on network neutrality, the GOP has finally joined the party. Through a draft bill released this month and congressional hearings last week, Republicans have taken a step in the direction of supporting network neutrality. That’s a good thing, and moves them closer to the existing consensus. Roughly four million Americans submitted comments to the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) calling for real network neutrality last year, and polls show that both Republicans and Democrats overwhelmingly support a ban on fast lanes. Read more » about Seven Reasons the New GOP Bill Will Not Give Us Net Neutrality

Intermediary Liability Updates from Turkey: Forcing Online Intermediaries to Create a Website Blocking-Friendly Infrastructure

Turkish governmental control of web traffic is on the rise. Recently, the Information Technology and Communications Authority (the "ITC Authority") updated the Authorization Regulation in the Electronic Communications Sector (“Authorization Regulation”) and the Administrative Sanctions Regulation. This is an administrative implementation of previously enacted legislation, which however introduces new obligations on telecommunications operators. Read more » about Intermediary Liability Updates from Turkey: Forcing Online Intermediaries to Create a Website Blocking-Friendly Infrastructure

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