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Argentine Supreme Court To Decide Whether Intermediaries Must Monitor/Take Down Search Results

Recently, the Supreme Court of Argentina heard arguments in Rodríguez, María Belén c/ Google Inc. y Otro s/ Daños y Perjuicios. The case requires the Supreme Court to decide for the first time whether Internet intermediaries - in this case, search engines Google and Yahoo - are liable for linking to content that violates fundamental rights or infringes copyright. It will also decide whether Google Image Search’s “thumbnails” infringe copyright law.

Whose laws control your data? The implications of the Microsoft search warrant challenge

Microsoft's challenge to the US warrant for customer data that is stored in Ireland raises issues that are important for every individual who uses online products and cares about how access to their data is governed. It also has implications for all tech and telco companies that store user data across jurisdictions. This note unpacks some of these issues and calls for a more nuanced debate. Read more » about Whose laws control your data? The implications of the Microsoft search warrant challenge

European Libraries Don't Need Permission to Digitize Books in Their Collection, Says Advocate General of the ECJ

Recently, an Advocate General with the European Court of Justice (ECJ) handed down an opinion in Technische Universität Darmstadt v Eugen Ulmer KG stating that European libraries may digize individual books in their collection without permission from the rightholders. Read more » about European Libraries Don't Need Permission to Digitize Books in Their Collection, Says Advocate General of the ECJ

Hong Kong Government Introduces Copyright Bill Providing a “Safe Harbor” for OSPs for Copyright Infringement

Today, the Hong Kong Government introduced the Copyright (Amendment) Bill 2014 into the Legislative Council to revise Hong Kong’s copyright law so as to “keep pace with technological and overseas developments.” Read more » about Hong Kong Government Introduces Copyright Bill Providing a “Safe Harbor” for OSPs for Copyright Infringement

Eleventh Circuit Says No to Warrantless Cell Tracking, Calls Other Metadata Programs Into Question

Today, the Eleventh Circuit rejected the exceedingly common law enforcement practice of warrantlessly tracking suspects’ physical location using cell phone tower data. The opinion, United States v. Davis, is both welcome and overdue. Defendants who have and will be physically tracked without a warrant have new legal support to challenge that surveillance. Read more » about Eleventh Circuit Says No to Warrantless Cell Tracking, Calls Other Metadata Programs Into Question

Internet & Jurisdiction Case Collections 2012 and 2013 in Retrospect

The Internet & Jurisdiction Project launched officially the case compilations 2012 and 2013 in Retrospect. 
 
The case collections ”2012 in Retrospect“ and “2013 in Retrospect” are a compilation of 460 selected cases. They show the tension between the cross-border nature of the Internet with its transnational online spaces and the patchwork of geographically defined national jurisdictions. They provide a review of crucial dynamics to stimulate discussions and trigger research with special emphasis on intermediary liability cases. 
 

April 2014 in Retrospect: Intermediary Liability News and More from the Internet and Jurisdiction Project

Retrospect is the monthly newsletter of the Internet & Jurisdiction Project - a global multi-stakeholder dialogue process that explores the tension between the cross-border nature of the Internet and national jurisdictions. Every month, the members of the Internet & Jurisdiction Observatory expert network identify the 20 most relevant cases through a progressive filtering process to inform the participants of the Internet & Jurisdiction Project on emerging trends around the world. Read more » about April 2014 in Retrospect: Intermediary Liability News and More from the Internet and Jurisdiction Project

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