Blog

NY Court Smacks Plaintiff Who Sued for Copyright Infringment over Use of Film Clip in Obituary

In a victory for fair use, Judge Barbara N. Jones granted the motion of defendants CNN, ABC and CBS for attorneys fees after they obtained summary judgment that their use of a brief film clip from the movie "The Story of G.I. Joe" in the obituary for actor Robert Mitchum was fair use, not copyright infringement. The Court found that the plaintiff's case was objectively unreasonable, especially given that the networks ran clips of 6-22 seconds of the 108 minute film. Read more » about NY Court Smacks Plaintiff Who Sued for Copyright Infringment over Use of Film Clip in Obituary

Copyright Office announces California hearings on DMCA anticircumvention exemptions

Among other things, the Digital Millennium Copyright Act prohibits the circumvention of technological measures that control access to copyrighted works. The Copyright office is currently engaged in rulemaking to possibly add exemptions to this prohibition.
Yesterday the Office announced that it will hold public hearings at the UCLA Law School in Los Angeles, California on Wednesday, May 14 and Thursday, May 15, from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. These hearings are in addition to hearings already scheduled in April in Washington, D.C. Read more » about Copyright Office announces California hearings on DMCA anticircumvention exemptions

Internet subcommittee of Congress to hear testimony on CARP reform bill

Congressman Lamar Smith has introduced the Copyright Royalty and Distribution Reform Act (H.R. 1417). In a nutshell, the Act would replace the Copyright Arbitration Royalty Panel (the body that set royalty rates for webcasters, large and small, based on the rate that Yahoo! was willing to pay RIAA) with an administrative law judge. More importantly, the Copyright Judge and his staff attorneys would be paid by the government, not by those who seek to participate in the rate-setting process, as they are now. Read more » about Internet subcommittee of Congress to hear testimony on CARP reform bill

Congress takes on CARP Reform

Congressman Lamar Smith has introduced the Copyright Royalty and Distribution Reform Act (H.R. 1417). In a nutshell, the Act would replace the Copyright Arbitration Royalty Panel (the body that set royalty rates for webcasters, large and small, based on the rate that Yahoo! was willing to pay RIAA) with an administrative law judge. More importantly, the Copyright Judge and his staff attorneys would be paid by the government, not by those who seek to participate in the rate-setting process, as they are now. Read more » about Congress takes on CARP Reform

Pages

Subscribe to Stanford CIS Blog