Blog

Should We Centralize the Right to be Forgotten Clearing House?

Being in Silicon Valley during the time when the honourable Court of Justice of the European Union "cracks" its epic right to be forgotten ruling, is a very interesting social experience. Suddenly, the European part of you receives a strange lot of attention among tech folks in all the small talks. No wonder. Google Spain C-131/12 for me is both great and terrible.

Are some companies 'yes men' when foreign governments ask for user data?

Once you start looking at which countries are requesting data from US companies, the next obvious (and critical) question is: how do companies respond to those requests? This is largely a matter of company discretion because the Electronic Communications Privacy Act does not apply to requests for user data from foreign governments. Without laws governing this important issue, foreign users are reliant on due diligence and good will by individual companies. Read more » about Are some companies 'yes men' when foreign governments ask for user data?

USA Freedom Act: Oh, Well. Whatever. Nevermind.

Over at Just Security, I have a post about the latest iteration of the USA Freedom Act. Basically, civil liberties groups are withdrawing support for the bill because it no longer clearly ends bulk collection of metadata and other information under Section 215 of the Patriot Act, the NSL statutes, and the intelligence pen/trap statute as the bill was supposed to do.  I explain the language changes that gutted the bill, and lament the state of Congress. Read more hereRead more » about USA Freedom Act: Oh, Well. Whatever. Nevermind.

Something Interesting in California's New Automated Vehicle Testing Rule

After a great deal of careful work, the California Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) today released its final rule for the testing of "autonomous vehicles" on public roads in the state. Accompanying this rule is a Final Statement of Reasons that, on page 9, contains a striking exchange: Read more » about Something Interesting in California's New Automated Vehicle Testing Rule

Net Neutrality’s Legal Binary: An Either/Or With No “Third Way”

People working on net neutrality wish for a “third way”–a clever compromise giving us both network neutrality and no blowback from AT&T, Verizon, Comcast and others. That dream is delusional because the carriers will oppose network neutrality in any real form; they want paid fast lanes. They have expressed particular opposition to “Title II” of the Communications Act—something telecom lawyers mention the same way normal people might reference the First or Second Amendments. Title II is the one essential law to ban paid fast lanes. Read more » about Net Neutrality’s Legal Binary: An Either/Or With No “Third Way”

Internet Search Engines Are Liable for Processing Personal Data, Says the ECJ

Earlier today, the European Court of Justice released its long-awaited decision in Google Spain. The ECJ ruled that "an internet search engine operator is responsible for the processing that it carries out of personal data which appear on web pages published by third parties.” Thus, under certain circumstances, search engines can be asked to remove links to webpages containing personal data.
 

Manager’s Amendment Puts Back Door Searches Back In USA Freedom Act

Over at Just Security I have an analysis of the USA Freedom Act as changed by a recent Manager's Amendment. Basically, I conclude that the Manager's Amendment fails to prohibit "back door searches" for US person information caught up in the NSA dragnet, which was supposedly one of the mail goals of the original bill.  Read more » about Manager’s Amendment Puts Back Door Searches Back In USA Freedom Act

Pages

Subscribe to Stanford CIS Blog