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Turkey Blocks Facebook, Twitter and YouTube over Images of Public Prosecutor Held Hostage

Today, a court in Istanbul ordered the ban of Twitter, Facebook and YouTube over the publication of the picture of a public prosecutor held hostage by extreme-Left militants. The blocking order on Twitter and Facebook was lifted after the social media sites complied with the request of removal. The ban of YouTube is still in place. Read more » about Turkey Blocks Facebook, Twitter and YouTube over Images of Public Prosecutor Held Hostage

Right to be Forgotten Must be Balanced with Freedom of the Press, Italian Privacy Authority Says

On March 31, 2015, the Italian Privacy Authority ("Authority") issued a decision stating that users cannot obtain the delisting of search results of recent news with a relevant public interest. However, search engines must delete or edit automatically generated snippets accompanying the search results if they are misleading.  Read more » about Right to be Forgotten Must be Balanced with Freedom of the Press, Italian Privacy Authority Says

(C) More Entertainment for Broadcasters: The European Court of Justice on Linking to Live Streams of Sport Events

A few days ago, the European Court of Justice (ECJ) decided C More Entertainment AB v Linus Sandberg. This is the last episode of the linking saga, previously discussed by the ECJ in Svensson and Bestwater. This time, the ECJ had to decide whether linking to live internet streams of sport events infringed on the exclusive related rights of broadcasting organizations. The ECJ concluded that national legislation may extend the exclusive right of the broadcasting organisations to acts of communication to the public encompassing broadcasts of sporting fixtures made live on internet. Read more » about (C) More Entertainment for Broadcasters: The European Court of Justice on Linking to Live Streams of Sport Events

Belgian Court Says That ISPs Must Not Pay a Copyright Levy to Collective Societies

 
On March 13, 2015, the Distric Court of Brussels decided that Internet Service Providers (ISPs) should not pay a copyright levy for communicating to the public the repertoire of SABAM, the Belgian association of authors, composers and publishers and the largest Belgian collective management organisation (CMO).
 

Landmark Intermediary Liability Decision from the Indian Supreme Court

Recently, the Supreme Court of India issued a landmark decision regarding the constitutionality of several provisions included in the Indian Information Technology Act ("IT Act"). The provisions dealt with content removal online and blocking orders. According to the Supreme Court, vague standards for blocking and removing content online are unconstitutional. Additionally, content blocking must be mandated only by a reasoned order from a judicial, administrative or governmental body and must be transparent. Read more » about Landmark Intermediary Liability Decision from the Indian Supreme Court

Which Cyberthreat Information Sharing Proposal You Should Support? (Hint: None)

It’s the season for “cyberthreat” information sharing proposals. There’s the White House plan, announced in January. There’s the Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act, or CISA, which passed out of the Senate Intelligence Committee on a 14-1 vote earlier this month. Read more » about Which Cyberthreat Information Sharing Proposal You Should Support? (Hint: None)

Doe v. Cisco: The International Law Legal Issues

Part I of this series outlined the procedural posture of the cases seeking to hold Cisco Systems liable for aiding and abetting the design, construction, implementation, and maintenance of China’s Golden Shield network surveillance system. This Part identifies the international law issues in play surrounding the law of corporate complicity under the Alien Tort Statute. Read more » about Doe v. Cisco: The International Law Legal Issues

China’s Golden Shield: Is Cisco Systems Complicit?

This is Part I of a series on a case pending in the Northern District of California against Cisco Systems involving the company's provision of technology to help construct, operate and maintain China's Golden Shield, a network surveillance system that was allegedly used to target Falun Gong practitioners for persecution. Part I outlines the claims in and procedural posture of the case; Part II discuses some of the legal issues in play with reference to other cases of corporate complicity in human rights abuses under the Alien Tort Statute. Read more » about China’s Golden Shield: Is Cisco Systems Complicit?

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