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Argentinian Telecoms (and Credit Cards) Ordered to Block UBER App

Argentina is in the midst of an inflamed debate on the lawfulness of UBER services. The last stage of the UBER affair—previously visiting cities like Milan or Paris—occurred in Buenos Aires. Finally, a number of orders from different authorities led to the blockade of the UBER app. In addition, credit card services were enjoined from processing payments connected to the App. Multiple arguments served as a legal basis to the different orders, including the endangerment of passengers´ health and safety and tax collection.
 

Litigating Platform Liability in Europe: New Human Rights Case Law in the Real World

This is the third of four posts on the European Court of Human Rights’ (ECHR) rulings in Delfi v. Estonia and MTE v. Hungary. In both cases, national courts held online news portals liable for comments posted by their users – even though the platforms did not know about them. These rulings effectively required platforms to monitor and delete user comments in order to avoid liability.

Policing Online Comments in Europe: New Human Rights Case Law in the Real World

This is the second of four posts on real-world consequences of the European Court of Human Rights’ (ECHR) rulings in Delfi v. Estonia and MTE v. Hungary. Both cases arose from national court rulings that effectively required online news portals to monitor users’ speech in comment forums. The first case, Delfi, condoned a monitoring requirement in a case involving threats and hate speech.

New Intermediary Liability Cases from the European Court of Human Rights: What Will They Mean in the Real World?

Last summer, the Grand Chamber of the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) delivered a serious setback to free expression on the Internet. The Court held, in Delfi v. Estonia, that a government could compel a news site to monitor its users’ online comments about articles.* This winter, the Court’s lower chamber ruled the other way in MTE v.

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