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USA v. Microsoft: what the decision does and doesn't mean

The decision in the Microsoft case has the potential to have significant effects on the way that foreign users' data is handled in the US. However, this is no time to become hysterical about what this does or does not mean for user rights. This quick note unpacks some of the assertions that are being made about the implications of the case. Read more » about USA v. Microsoft: what the decision does and doesn't mean

Australian Government's Leaked Proposal to Force ISPs to Monitor Copyright Infringement

A discussion paper from the Australian Government titled "Online Copyright Infringement" leaked a few days ago. The paper included proposals to amend Australian copyright law and force ISPs to monitor copyright infringment. Under the proposal, ISPs may be requested to help to prevent Australians from infringing copyright by blocking peer-to-peer traffic, slowing down internet connections, passing on warnings from industry groups, and handing over subscriber details to copyright owners.
 

British Columbia Court of Appeal Refuses to Stay Enforcement in Equustek Solutions v. Google

As reported here, on June 13, 2014, the Supreme Court of British Columbia ordered Google to block a website worldwide in Equustek Solutions Inc. v. Jack. Later, Google applied for leave to appeal the decision and for an order staying the enforcement of the order. Read more » about British Columbia Court of Appeal Refuses to Stay Enforcement in Equustek Solutions v. Google

Reflections on the UK's DRIP Act

It’s not straightforward being a law enforcement officer in the UK in 2014. I often think of how different my working existence is to that of my great-grandfather, also in law enforcement, but working in a small Scottish village in the late 19th Century. The highlight of Constable Taylor’s 30-year career was once catching a burglar.  Read more » about Reflections on the UK's DRIP Act

Sohu vs Toutiao: Chinese Mobile News App Sued by News Publishers for Copyright Infringement

Recently, a 120 million users mobile application, Toutiao (“headline” in Chinese), got on the nerves of traditional and Internet news publishers in China. In late June, China's Internet giant Sohu sued Toutiao for copyright infringement and unfair competition before the Beijing Haidian District Court. 
 

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