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Without My Consent is Seeking Research Participants to Better Understand Online Harassment

Online stalking, harassment, and invasions of privacy can be incredibly destructive. Yet very little empirical data exisits regarding these incidents. This paucity of data hinders educational, support, research and policy efforts. Without My Consent, a non-profit organization seeking to combat online invasions of privacy, is conducting research to better understand the experiences of online harassment. If you are 18 or older and have experienced harassment on the Internet, please consider taking their survey. Read more » about Without My Consent is Seeking Research Participants to Better Understand Online Harassment

OpEd-pocylpse on NSA's illegal and unwise surveillance

This morning, the NY Times posted my op-ed, co-authored with CIS affiliate scholar Chris Sprigman, arguing that the two federal statutes the Obama Administration has pointed to as authorizing NSA mass surveillance of our phone calls, emails, chats, social networking, etc. -- the FISA Amendments Act and the Patriot Act -- don't actually authorize the NSA's conduct. Read more » about OpEd-pocylpse on NSA's illegal and unwise surveillance

Tool Without A Handle: The Dark Side

Every tool can be misused, and potential harms from such misuse are often checked through force of law. Information technology is no different. To consider regulating information technology through use of the tool metaphor, we need to first consider the dynamics of information technology regulation in general. This blog post addresses key aspects of information technology regulation: how regulation is at once incapable of fully addressing the potential harms that flow from misuse of information technology, but powerful nonetheless in shaping how information technology tools are built and used. Read more » about Tool Without A Handle: The Dark Side

Border Militarization Unacceptable Compromise

The Corker-Hoeven Amendment moved one step closer to being added to Senate Bill 744 yesterday with a 67-27 vote on a motion to invoke cloture.  The Corker-Hoeven Amendment deals a great blow to border communities and privacy advocates.  The Amendment essentially creates a separate country located on our southern border governed by Border Patrol Agents and unprecedented amounts of technological devices.  The amendment is so dramatic that Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) told CNN that the U.S. Read more » about Border Militarization Unacceptable Compromise

Surveillance Myth #1: I Have Nothing to Hide

In the public debate over secret NSA spying, we keep hearing three refrains to justify, or at least accommodate people, to the U.S. government's surveillance practices. These are, "the spying is legal, so there's nothing improper", "mass surveillance is the price we have to pay for national security" and "I have nothing to hide so why should I worry?"  Read more » about Surveillance Myth #1: I Have Nothing to Hide

Center for Internet and Society Launches “Cookie Clearinghouse” to Enable User Choice for Online Tracking

The Center for Internet and Society (CIS) at Stanford Law School launched a new online privacy initiative today called the “Cookie Clearinghouse,” which will empower Internet users to make informed choices about online privacy. The Cookie Clearinghouse is being spearheaded by Aleecia M. McDonald, the Director of Privacy at CIS. Read more » about Center for Internet and Society Launches “Cookie Clearinghouse” to Enable User Choice for Online Tracking

Could Overreaction to Cybersecurity Threats Hurt Transparency at Home?

Last week, President Obama met with Chinese President Xi Jinping to discuss the ongoing problem of Chinese cyber espionage. The Obama administration has recently detailed increased efforts by some companies and their governments (most notably Chinese on both counts) to steal valuable information from the U.S. Read more » about Could Overreaction to Cybersecurity Threats Hurt Transparency at Home?

Whistleblowing about government surveillance - political offense or serious crime?

It seems like the world has been turned upside down when a US citizen flees to China seeking political asylum. And yet Edward Snowden is apparently hiding out in a secret location in Hong Kong after revealing that he is responsible for the leaked information on the US government’s PRISM program of surveillance. He explains his choice of refuge as being based on Hong Kong’s reputation for defending freedom of speech. He is also apparently considering Iceland as another potential refuge. But if the US chooses to prosecute him, will he be able to avoid being sent home to face charges? A key part of the answer lies in whether his leaking of official secrets qualifies as a ‘political offense’. Read more » about Whistleblowing about government surveillance - political offense or serious crime?

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