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The Cross-Border Data Fix: It’s Not So Simple

The House Judiciary Committee held a hearing yesterday on cross-border data requests, featuring testimony from the Department of Justice, the U.K. government, Google, the Center for Democracy and Technology, state law enforcement, and Professor Andrew Woods. Everyone recognizes the problem: law enforcement outside the U.S. can’t get data for their legitimate investigations from U.S.

BREIN v. Ziggo: The Pirate Bay Dies Again

The Pirate Bay (TPB), that perennial nemesis of copyright holders, is on the ropes again following the CJEU's decision this week in BREIN v. Ziggo. BREIN, the Dutch entertainment industry trade group, sued two ISPs—Ziggo and XS4ALL—seeking a court order to compel them to block the domain names and IP addresses of the legendary torrent sharing site. The Supreme Court of the Netherlands referred two questions to the CJEU: (1) whether TPB’s operation of a searchable index of torrent files violates copyright holders’ right of communication to the public under Article 3(1) of the EU InfoSoc Directive; and (2), in the event that it does, whether the requested injunctions are appropriate against intermediaries under Article 8(3) of the InfoSoc Directive and Article 11 of the IPR Enforcement Directive. This post will focus on the first question, concerning TPB’s liability for unauthorized “communication to the public.”

Tool Without a Handle: Mutual Transparency in Social Media

“Tool Without a Handle:  Mutual Transparency in Social Media”

“I wish that for just one time
You could stand inside my shoes
And just for that one moment
I could be you”

Bob Dylan – “Positively 4th Street”

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The “Right to Be Forgotten” and National Laws Under the GDPR

The EU’s new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) will come into effect in the spring of 2018, bringing with it a newly codified version of the “Right to Be Forgotten” (RTBF).  Depending how the new law is interpreted, this right could prove broader than the “right to be de-listed” established in 2014’s Google Spain case.  It could put even more decisions about the balance between privacy and free expression in the hands of private Internet platforms like Google.

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